Global Democracy Global Democracy

Disclaimer for airbrushed models

by  000000004, in Society,  for Global  on December 18, 2011, 10:39 am  · 2732 | 21 · 64175 Views

We all now know that seeing thousands of "perfect" body types in the mass media is having negative affects on young girls and more. Airbrushing as a practice should be discouraged when it transforms otherwise permanent features on models. A "mandatory disclaimer" to state that a model has had her physical body manipulated on a computer is a very simple step in the right direction to addressing the harm that we're causing.

  • hentschel (Canada) 2 years ago I object because airbrushed models are hotter than non-airbrushed models

  • hopefulgirl (Canada) 2 years ago hentschel = lame.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago Let's do this

  • Anonymous 2 years ago We all have the perfect body. Its what we do with it that makes the true body

  • AustinGMackell (Australia) 2 years ago i think only in advertising

  • GD000001063 (Canada) 2 years ago and magazine covers.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago By choice, I am not exposed to a lot of pictures of airbrushed models, but I do see some photographs of them and they have made me feel bad about my body even thought I know that it is unreal and unhealthy. I definitely think that a disclaimer should be mandatory.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago hentschel - i hope your comment is only a stupid provocation

  • Anonymous 2 years ago @ anon - it is. world is full of wankers unfortunately.

  • jaydencrowe (United States) 2 years ago i've seen a number of posts from hentschel that are unproductive and immature, i wonder if there is a way to limit his involvement? and by his involvement i mean the millions of forum trolls that i believe (but pray they won't) will destroy the credibility and goal of this site.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago don't mind them this is a great cause

  • 000001238 (Australia) 2 years ago I object because it is what it is, most people are aware that models are airbrushed.

  • GD000001192 (Canada) 2 years ago I vote up this idea because it is not so difficult to implement. More transparency is often more good than bad. I object to the other voter who didn't agree : just because you know it, doesn't mean that EVERYONE ELSE is aware, knowledgeable or smart enough of airbrushed or retouched pictures. You'd be surprised at the level of rampant ignorance in the world...

    "Maturity is when all your mirrors turns into windows". "We don't see the world as it is, we see it as we are".

  • waylonsweat (United States) 2 years ago I object because The people who are employed to do the airbrush touch ups are techinally artist. To censor them is to censor thier art and in turn free speech.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago Is that technically censorship? It's not banning airbrushing from pictures, it's just stating that is has in fact been airbrushed. Similar to putting a warning label on cigarettes. Similar to saying drink responsibly on all alcohol ads. Similar to saying caution, contents are hot. You get the idea. It's simply reminding the public to live a healthy lifestyle (and not make stupid decisions). It may not always work, but it plants the seed in your head. It would be beneficial to have a disclaimer. What harm could come from having a mandatory disclaimer? A lot less harm than what is caused without one.

  • waylonsweat (United States) 2 years ago Manditory disclaimers always lead to further regulation.

  • hopefulgirl (Canada) 2 years ago I love this idea!

  • Anonymous 2 years ago Wait...OK, I understand what the message is and I am a supporter. But let's be 100% serious. Do you guys really think that putting a disclaimer on magazines and advertisements is going to make any difference at all? I really doubt it. Like, I'm an optimist most of the time, but this really seems like a waste of a lot of effort and complaining and moaning. I doubt that seeing that disclaimer would make a girl with an already low self esteem and poor body image (which is, let's face it, who you are concerned about). Can you really imagine that girl looking at any fashion magazine and seeing that and saying to herself, "oh, I feel totally better. These models are airbrushed."? I mean, seriously? Putting a disclaimer on advertisements would do about as much good as putting one on all Dragon Ball Z shows, or whatever it is kids watch these days. I think that something needs to be done to help girls, and boys for that matter, who have low self esteems, but this is just ridiculous. Assuming this is even implemented, which I am almost sure it won't, it will do nothing to change what you want to change

  • GD000001469 (United States) 2 years ago I object because This website is not for such petty concerns as imposing a legislation stating that airbrushed models must be disclaimed as such. They'll make the font microscopic just to abide by said legislation, as they already do for so much other legislation, and the impact will be null. You must understand there is an underlying problem here... We must socialize women in an honest and realistic environment, teach them to respect themselves and they will be equipped to identify these ads, and the world, for what they are - no more, no less. Apparently we've failed to correctly socialize our young women as such, or this would not be an issue at all. Plus, with technology growing as it is, and every generation being more comfortable with it than the last, our young women will become increasingly used to such tawdry advertising, and understand it is no more than that. If they don't, well, that's the parent's fault.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago Boy that relaly helps me the heck out.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago I've broken two of these now, each tailsng about 7 to 8 years. The weak point is if you stand on it on even a slighly uneven surface (like one wheel on a kitchen rug and the other two wheels on the tile floor), the stem on the wheel caster will snap off and break. Because it is plastic and weight bearing, the caster wheel stem cannot be repaired. I've searched for a replacement caster, but it seems difficult to find an exact match. The step stool works ok with just two wheels, but doesn't roll as nicely, and I think it won't be long before another wheel snaps and breaks. I'm thinking of buying the all steel rolling kick stool. This model is almost all plastic material.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago I understand the idea, and I would support it... But why allow the ads to be so manipulated in the first place? UK finally banned misleading ads not too long ago. The American Medical Association has proposed the same thing over and over again for the US, but no action has been taken... whatsoever...

    I think instead of disclaiming, there should be restrictions on how much photoshop can be used in an image - prohibiting manipulation of people in images.

    And to the douchebag who commented 3 months ago, "I object because airbrushed models are hotter than non-airbrushed models", what makes you think the homogenized sense of beauty is what makes a woman "hotter" than someone with natural, unique beauty? Even so, is that worth the increasing rate of girls becoming anorexic (killing 1 of 5 diagnosed), bullemic, depressed, losing self esteem, and worse?

  • GD000001769 (Netherlands) 2 years ago Great idea-- simply because depression is an illness that is preventable and should be addressed. And I would like to point out that some voters don't understand the proposal; this is not a limitation of freedom of speech it is to combat false advertising.

  • WrongWay (Italy) 2 years ago Totally agree.

  • Anonymous 2 years ago Let's make the airbrushed models disclaimer as big and as ugly as the warnings on cigarette packages, until we eliminate advertising that is

  • 000001884 (United States) 2 years ago Only in advertisements, art should not be hindered with.

  • GDSupporter1 (United States) 2 years ago I'm for truth in advertizing. I agree with GD000001192. And would like to add that there should be a symbol or a logo that looks like a paintbrush that takes up a designated percentage of the airbrushed photo. Perhaps .5% or 1% with a minimum pixel size of 15x15.

  • RiKi57 (Canada) 2 years ago I object because do we then outlaw make-up.

  • jennifer28 (United States) 2 years ago I agree with GDSupporter1's idea of adding an icon to indicate that it has been air-brushed. Someone brought up the point that everyone knows that images in the media are air-brushed, but I beg to differ. Children, particularly young girls who tend to be exposed to these images more frequently, think that these idealized people with "perfect bodies" are an example and that's what they should look like, when in fact, it's one's uniqueness that makes them beautiful. It seems to me that adding some sort of obvious disclaimer would do a lot of good, and really who is it hurting? Touch-up artists would still have jobs, and actually get credit for their work; it could change the opinions of lots of girls and boys who think they have to fit into a certain mold. This is a movement that is simple, but powerful, and one that we must support.

  • GD000001993 (Spain) 2 years ago I object because there's lost of other big problems in the world to take care of a simple thing like this

  • Anonymous 2 years ago Well, for sure it will be always other problems to solve. However, saying that won't solve anything. I think it's better try to solve one of them, even if it's not the most important, than keep doing nothing.

  • JaredONeill22 (United States) 2 years ago First of all, you would still have the freedom of speech, so unfortunately for the creator of this idea, it wont pull off. What people choose to do to themselves is their choice. Or even the way they choose to portray themselves, thats their choice as well. You can't force someone to do a certain picture a certain way because that's the way "you" would like to see it, Then we would have a bunch of dictators running around instead of honest good willed constituents. While we may agree with the cause of this article, and find it demeaning towards our women, the goal is unreal and wont be accomplished.

  • jamesg1951 (Canada) 2 years ago I object because disclaimers are just a means of allowing the deception to continue, air brushing should be prosecuted under the false advertising banner and severley punished

  • Anonymous 2 years ago I agree that photo-shopped models are false advertising. The advertisers need to fess up to what they are doing. I only found out that the computer manipulation makes models look thinner this year. Putting it out there reminds people to say to themselves, "this is not real". Advertising is designed to persuade us to buy products. That puts it into a different category than art/cinema.

  • Frankhey (Canada) 2 years ago I propose everyone teach the children the difference between healthy and unhealthy and take responsibility for what we teach them to follow, we are the role models, we allow our kids to buy these things, why? because they want it !! why? because we taught them it is okay. opting for the easy route of "Banning" something is doing exactly what we all despise. I really hope i do not need to explain that.

  • ispalma (Portugal) 2 years ago I object because it has no relevant output. The problem is low self estime and overated importance to looks.

  • 000002594 (United States) one year ago I object because are you kidding me, turn off the damn tv and put down the multi media print. How in the world does this affect the state of our world today? This suggestion and the number of votes it has speaks directly to how out of touch we as a people are and how unconscience and asleep we are unbelievable!

  • GD000002616 (United States) one year ago I object because Use

  • Coubelle (United Kingdom) one year ago I agree with this action as the media portrays a false and unreachable image for the average girl. This causes depression and a terrible feeling of inadequacy that I would not wish on anyone. People claiming we can 'just turn off our TVs' are wrong, deluded and are clearly a male who doesn't see the images of women the same way these young girls do. Should we have to turn off the TV and isolate ourselves to be happy? Of course not! How about instead of that idea the world embraces us for who we are! Works with us and brings out a true perception of beauty - EACH AND EVERY WOMAN IN HER OWN RIGHT!

  • GD000002784 (United States) one year ago I agree with this action. It's easy to dismiss harmful behavior when there doesn't appear to be any direct physical harm done to an individual or group. But that doesn't make it innocent. We need to start paying attention to every action and how it affects others and ourselves. We - men and women alike - need to stop contributing to sexism and stop allowing any amount of denigration of women to happen in any form and at any level.

  • Anonymous one year ago GD000001993, there are lots of issues in this world. I really don't think that there is much you can do to stop other things or issues, like most armed conflicts. Honestly, if you can just help to resolve one problem, the world will be better for it.

  • loopylozzy1992 (United Kingdom) one year ago People being exposed to this every day has a great effect on girls self esteems.

  • Anonymous one year ago People should learn by what they're doing does much more to the world than money making.
    It destroys lives.

  • ryan.scholes.50 (United States) one year ago I object because this can only lead to disclaimers on everything. Like for example: guy wearing thick soled shoes, not actually 5'6''. I see this as only distracting people from the issues that really matter like everyone becoming nudists.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago And we should post signs advising that water will make you wet and cheeseburgers will make you fat and that your pants are too tight for you. At what point do we give up any hope that people are or can be made smart enough to realize that objects in mirror are closer than they appear and just bubble wrap them for their protection. Didn't feminists used to decry the infantilization of women. Now folks want to infantilize everyone (for their own protection).

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think this makes sense. Young women obsess about their bodies and become anorexic or bulimic trying to make their bodies look like these fake models. NO ONE has the perfect body depicted in magazines, ads, etc.

  • GD000003883 (United States) 9 months ago I submit that non-airbrushed models are hotter than airbrushed models.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago we are all beautiful In every shape and color that we come from…….. Air brush or not as long as we are good people to one an other that is all that matters.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Why not just keep it real? Real people are a heck of a lot more interesting to look at in all shapes and sizes and colors. Photoshop manipulation just makes people look unreal and airbrushed. Like plastic surgery - you can do a little and pull it off, but if you over do it - it looks like your fake.

  • kdreeves1 (United States) 9 months ago I think this is a fantastic idea. Make the media at least own up to what they do and the sociological effect of their depictions of women, their bodies, and their sexuality.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It should be mandatory to disclose airbrushing, as it should be mandatory to disclose anything that is not true.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago A "mandatory disclaimer" is a band-aid, and, to be honest, probably wouldn't work. The mandatory ingredients listings on foods and posted in fast food chains have done little to curb the eating of junk food. And what would follow a mandatory disclaimer? Having announcements at every fashion show that declares, "The models that you are about to see are real but do not have typical measurements"?

    If you're trying to protect your kids from cutting themselves, you don't mandate warning labels on every knife, blade, or pair of scissors manufactured, you teach them about reality. The onus of this isn't with the advertisers who are generating the unrealistic images; currently, that's their job. The responsibility belongs to the parental figures who should be taking ownership of giving their kids a clear picture of the real world.

    I don't have a rabid First Amendment attitude about this matter - for example, I love that some music can be labeled as "explicit", allowing for both better consumer choices and artistic freedom. But this mandatory disclaimer proposal would be as effective as the "Professional Driver on a Closed Course - Do Not Attempt" warnings that are ubiquitous and ignored on every automobile spot you see today.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago More toxic than tobacco...needs a label

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Regardless of the source of body image ideals (culture vs. evolution), wouldn't the prohibition of making older models look younger and slimmer simply drive the demand for younger, slimmer models? If Photoshop stops sneakily making middle-aged women look like teenagers, wouldn't they simply be replaced by teenagers? I disagree with the prediction that reducing Photoshop retouching would result in more natural-looking adult bodies in media. (Wouldn't we also need a disclaimer that says, "This model/actress has had 20 plastic surgeries?")

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree with this, women are most beautiful naturally, without make-up & accoutrements.

  • matei (Romania) 9 months ago we've taken this idea of beauty too far and it's causing problems across social strata and gender lines - women worry that they might not be attractive enough and men worry that they cannot live up to the manufactured image of masculine attractiveness.

  • okie (United States) 9 months ago The worldwide standard should be for full disclosure. Anything else is a fraud. If one wishes to view a hot model there will always be places where a customer can go to see them.

    But what the most moral entities will do will be the right thing. And if there is a disclaimer then I am more likely to patronize that business over one that does not show the notation.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This should be mandatory

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Agree

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I met a 12 year old girl a few days back who does nothing the entire day but obsess about her looks and wants to be slip and 'hot' like the models on TV.

    We need to stop creating such unrealistic images on impressionable minds ... it leads to young girls thinking they are not beautiful. Their self esteem is lowered by the second. EVERYBODY IS BEAUTIFUL AND PERFECT IN THEIR OWN WAY. The media needs to stop creating a bar as to who can be termed as Beautiful.

    Such images also leaves an impression on the male population, where they are ONLY looking for such perfect beauties that DONOT exist in the real world!

    A disclaimer should be added and followed by the media. But besides a disclaimer, the media should be banned altogether from manipulating beauty. People should be shown the way they are

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Awesome; great idea. <3

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is not fair to for our women and sets an unrealistic goal that can never be achieved. It also put an undue expectation on our women and they live their lifes becuase of the pressure from the images crated by the media.

  • jahneen (United Kingdom) 9 months ago it's a non reality & girls and women should know that images we see are art interpretation & not real. Though it can be hard to tell the difference a disclaimer would help with this and may also encourage celebs to go without too (or maybe not!) but at

  • jahneen (United Kingdom) 9 months ago it needs to be known that these images are a non reality. We can't have girls and women comparing themselves against...what? an artists interpretation of a model. It should be labeled clearly. Perhaps the photoshop artist might get a mention (as they put in much more work than the original model did anyway!) Also celebs may be less lightly to be airbrushed if theres a disclaimer (or maybe not!)

  • 000003971 (Australia) 9 months ago A year ago GD000001469 (United States) stated that they objected because it is pointless as they would make the writing so small you wouldn't be able to see it. That is in fact correct and along with mandatory disclaimers the mandate would state how large the font must be etc in order to abide by the law. They also suggested that we have failed to 'socialise young women in a realistic and honest environment and teach them to respect themselves anyway'.

    Sorry but what a pile of hogwash that is. If that is the attitude we take then no real change can ever take effect. To simply socialise them is akin to saying 'aww heck, women can't vote, oh well, let's just demand that we socialise them to an honesty and realistic environment where only men can vote. The feminist movement fought for equality and yet here we are in the 21st century and still women aren't able to be who they are and seen for who they are and portrayed flaws and all in media and be seen as HUMANS. It is more than simply being seen as beautiful, it is being seen as human and not the product of 'we have to comply and be altered' and subjected to that. The act of being manipulated and altered is oppression towards women.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is not to outlaw anything, this is mearly a notice that will let the readers know that the women portraid have been altered to suit an ideal.
    This WOULD make a difference because young men and women would be more AWARE that the highly objectified stereotype IS NOT real and should be viewed as "art" at the most. And I highly disagree that most people know that models are airbrushed - very young children are subject to these "sexified" adverts on a daily basis. And yes, we as parents have a duty to inform our children, but as we know - kids dont listen. Back our statements up by putting a disclaimer on it.

  • 000003999 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago From a Commercial Design point of view I don't think I've ever had an image publishing that hasn't been manipulated. I agree with all the negative comments (lame and artistic), but, I believe that freedom of information should be asserted in a disclaimer on every image. This is a very evocative subject that does affect millions of women and men and their self image, to assert the contrary is completely delusional.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago change

  • GD000004039 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago A very good idea! Please pursue it.

  • GD000004039 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago This is an excellent idea which no sensible person could object to.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Agree. The search for the impossible attainment of physical perfection leads to massive self-esteem issues and unrealistic expectations of self. This can lead to eating disorders, emotional distress and self-harm. It becomes harder and harder in the developed world to be content with what we are and what we have due to the power of the media. Yes everyone "knows" they're airbrushed but the eye believes what it sees and it makes a huge negative impact when we (most of us) don't live up to that ideal.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago They must to inform people that the image contains airbrushed models.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago A good idea. A start. One piece in a big puzzle.

  • GD000004061 (United States) 9 months ago Thank you for this idea! This has been a great example to share with my girls, and to let them know that no one is that flawless. A mandatory disclaimer on all advertising should be given when any type of distortion is used!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Excellent idea! I think banning anorexic models is a great idea as well.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I feel that there should be a disclaimer at the bottom of the screen so moms can point at it for their daughters

  • Anonymous 9 months ago People who disagree on the basis that the underlying problem lies in women's education are missing the whole point of this great idea. The problem is not women. The problem is not education. The problem is the emphasis the whole world puts on beautiful bodies, both male and female. If a woman learns to identify and ignore these ads, does it make the problem go away? It only makes rebellious women who challenge the status quo but fail because in the end, if the whole world doesn't support them they are simply outcast feminist punks no one cares about. I completely support this idea and would probably spill blood for it.

  • 000004074 (United States) 9 months ago This is absolutely imperative, as young girls grow up with significantly lower body images than boys. If advertisers refuse to recognise real women's physiques, then the least they can do is own up to the major manipulation they do to make us all look like Barbie dolls.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I 100% agree with this idea

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is a very good idea. Many women (young and old) are developing eating disorders and other mental health issues because their trying to fit into this mainstream idea of perfection. It's time people know that these images are not real.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes. This is perfect. The "imperfect" will become more norm and beauty as is will be appreciated. It's way more fun to do yourself up less anyhow :) More time for other things.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree

  • 000004084 (United States) 9 months ago I am in!

  • christinalouisestone (United States) 9 months ago Great idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Airbrush all you want, but add a disclaimer stating as much.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I totally agree with the disclosure of airbrush models on advertising that is only creating false hopes on our kids

  • GD000004102 (United States) 9 months ago just like for cigarettes and probably GM foods....i see young girls every day suffering from this

  • 000004122 (United States) 9 months ago Has anything happened to advance this cause? I have just found this site today. This is almost 2 years old. I hope there is something tangible in the works to get the pushed through.

  • TaliaB5 (United States) 9 months ago This is a fantastic idea. Im a mother of two daughters and one son...I myself have always battled with body image, although Im in shape and healthy. I don't ever want my daughters to have unrealistic expectations for themselves or my son to have them of the women he will one day date and marry.

  • 000004124 (United States) 9 months ago You can't ban the magazine from the airbrushing, but you can't start affecting magazine/ publishing norms, but enforcing a mandatory disclaimer. Already, because some models have died from anorexia recently, more and more fashion houses are starting to employ healthier models. What we need is a healthier idea of what beauty is. I think before you jump on this and respond, talk to someone who has felt body shamed by looking at an airbrushed model and thought to themselves this is what I should look like, this is what beauty is, when it's not even real. Try to understand how it has affected their psyche. If you choose to be open and respectful of people and why this hurts so many men and women, then you can experience the true beauty of the world, compassion.

  • kortenie (Canada) 9 months ago I vote for the children and the teens who are growing up and seeing these images and are too young to realize that the models aren't real. Just because you people who object know the difference, doesn't mean the next generation knows right off the bat.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I object because putting a disclaimer won't change the way models look. Seriously, if people want it to stop it should be banned altogether.

  • kakumoro (Indonesia) 9 months ago In my opinion, airbrushed models of clothing brands advertisements should be the one being the matter. We need to minimize the topic. The word 'Model' here, is it addressing people who are posing for advertisement, or people who are walking on the catwalk? They're both 'models', and their physical appearances are manipulated not only with computer software, but also with make up.

    Well, it's advertisement. You need to look presentable to perform in front of a lot of people. A little bit of editing with the lighting or background is fine, but heavy editing that transforms a face to another - NO.
    ...unless you're making realistic models for videogames and/or cartoons.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Support it completely. So harmful for us and the younger generations

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Please do this. it makes only good sense.

  • rachaelalphonso (India) 9 months ago An excellent idea! These Air-brushed images are the reason we have so many complications with anorexia, bulimia, body-image disorder, etc... :(

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Good idea!

  • peng.k.chang.9 (China) 9 months ago 为了一个视频 找到出处了

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I am fine with taking off a scar, temporary blemish etc. But the complete overhaul could use a disclaimer. Truth in advertising.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago People should be who they are

  • Anonymous 9 months ago NO ONE IS PERFECT IN THIS WORLD WHAT HAPPENED TO NATURAL BEAUTY?EVEN AIRBRUSHED MODELS ARE NOT "HOTTER" THAN THOSE THAT ARE NOT.

  • IgniteHope (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Yes I agree. I am tired of seeing images of women distorted by editing tools. These pictures are presented as an 'ideal' which is deeply damaging to self-esteem. Furthermore these representations of women are disrespectful and limiting. As the media - through magazines, bill-boards, film etc surround us in the Western world it takes considerable inner resources to combat the constant onslaught of this weird projections.

    Hurrah for real women! Rejoice in their diversity, their ideas, passions, work and integrity!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Advertisers should ALWAYS have to admit to manipulating bodies in order to sell products!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago i would like to see this disclaimer. very much.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I want to know when I am seeing a real body or an unreal body.

  • Lula (Spain) 9 months ago Stop playing with womans

  • Anonymous 9 months ago As a mother of one daughter and two granddaughters I wholeheartedly support the idea of a mandatory disclaimer which should be in very visible print

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is not a "simple problem". It's a HUGE one. The young people these images affect are the future of our society. But not just that. They are real people, with real self esteems, that are being brainwashed to think that they are inadequate and aren't "normal" looking. Their self esteems and views of their role in society are greatly altered by the images they see on the covers of magazines, advertisements, movies, music videos, ect . These images are everywhere. It's not just an advertisement. It's a constant reminder to the 12, 17, or even 20 something year old girl struggling to think she's pretty that her normal body is not "adequate" by America's standard. I'm 27 years old, and it wasn't until about two years ago that I realized real women aren't suppose to look like unhuman freaks of nature. Until I realized this I was extremely insecure. Never thinking that I was thin enough, pretty enough, or worth any man's attention. And you know what? There is nothing wrong with me! But these stupid images brainwashed me AND my (now ex) boyfriend into thinking that I had to look like the edited photos of Adriana Lima to be beautiful or desirable. I found an untouched photo of her and showed it to him, and he said, "Oh, wow. She's still pretty. But she looks...different. Not what she looks like in her other pictures." From then on he stopped his babbling about how ''perfect" she was. I don't think it's wrong to wear makeup. I wear it when going out or when I want an extra pick-me up. Anyone can wear makeup, it's not an extreme body dis morphism. It's something that is around everyone in real life, everyday, and doesn't have to be permanent to achieve. You can see it face to face and know that it's fake. In fact I go without makeup more than I wear it! But when I DO wear it, people know that it's not EXACTLY what i look like. I only wear enough to enhance my natural features. But men and women who see these images DON'T know what is real and what's fake about them. I know with the utmost certainty that if I were a model I would NOT want my photos touched up. If they were, it would basically be the media telling me I wasn't good enough. Thank goodness I don't look like those women. I'm natural, normal, and perfect just the way God made me! Haters- go ahead and rip all you want. You are those brainwashed men and women I was talking about. Most of you shallow, and childish in your thinking. Disclaimers on these images are a great idea. I'm all for it! Lets take back our beauty for what it is, and should always be! :)

  • Anonymous 9 months ago go for it!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Go for it!

  • 000004219 (United States) 9 months ago BAN airbrushing, don't just disclaim it, you really think girls are going to pay attention to the fine print?

  • 000004218 (United States) 9 months ago This is a great idea, one that is long overdue.

  • 000004232 (South Africa) 9 months ago Let's see the truth as it is.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I´m in! As far as we print health warnings on tobacco packages it is also necessary to tell people that these artificial bodies aren´t real! Because they are intended to look natural it is a real danger for esp. younger girls that they start to think they are ugly themselves. In the end all these "perfect" images are definite lies! And people should be told they are lied at.

    On the other hand: When we start with this, we could also change the whole advertising business. Because most ad´s are lying! The clean, shiny car running smoothly on an open road into a marvellous landscape, sun shining brightly, no traffic at all - is nothing but a big, fat lie! So shouldn´t we have a disclaimer for that, too?

  • lindsizzle (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Fully in support. What is being done is sick - from black models being made to look white to women with beautiful bodies being made to look like barbies. Stop it all together, I say.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I object because women are already sexulalized enough. We need a break.

  • Chell (United States) 9 months ago I object because women are already sexualized as it is. We need a break.

  • Chell (United States) 9 months ago Agree, not object*

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes! Mandatory!

  • acarrillo26 (United States) 9 months ago the industry shows how not to love your real beauty instead how to cover up your real beauty and showing that's "beauty" =(

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes...and here is a great documentary...http://www.covergirlculture.com/wp-content/uploads/PRESS-Release-CGC-April2012-opt.pdf

  • woolyshamblers (United States) 9 months ago As a mother, as a woman, as a photographer, as an artist... I think anytime a photo is heavily altered, it should be noted in their citation. Some things are very obvious when airbrushing occurs, but I think altering beautiful bodies sets a poor standard for both men and women to compete with. People tend to think the women in their everyday lives should actually look that way and women are frustrated when they can't keep up. The human body is beautiful and wonderful! If you want to create your own body for advertising; good! Do exactly that. Consider it a cartoon, not a real person.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago More realistic body images for us all would be great!!

  • AnnWalker (United States) 9 months ago This is an excellent idea. Young girls, and mature women, are negatively influenced by these unrealistic representations. Why hasn't anyone thought of this before? I support it wholeheartedly.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think there a lot of other dislaimer that need to be added... this one is a good start....

  • AnneH (New Zealand) 9 months ago Totally agree with this idea. Let's bring some honesty into this industry.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I would have to agree that this Disclaimer should be mandatory. I think a similar disclaimer should be put in all pornographic fields as well stating that the events that occur or not real and that it should also further state the negative side effects of it , just as it would on a carton of cigarettes. Awareness is a huge step in the right direction. I vote yes on mandatory disclaimers.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago and hentschel from Canada...You obviously have been so deprived of real human contact and interaction that you are completely devoid of what it means to be human, have flaws and understanding the concept of seeing imperfect people perfectly. I hope you have a huge wake up call one of these days and change you mind and see the value of what is real.

  • 000004309 (United States) 9 months ago I object to "mandatory disclaimers".

  • Anonymous 9 months ago First off, I would like to share a message with those that "object" to having a disclaimer - YOU are part of the problem. By objecting you are proving exactly everything that is wrong with our society and our skewed/fallacious perspective on what beauty is. Please, I advice to take a look at yourself in the mirror, and look at everyone around you, and try to say what is beautiful and what isn't. This mentality is fake and dangerous. So please do yourselves a favor, and learn how to be a good human being, because your comments prove otherwise, and are holding us who give a shit about making things better -- from progress.

    Just like cigarettes have mandatory disclaimers, so should airbrushed images shared on the media.

    This skewed standard of beauty controlled by the media encourages/promotes/causes:

    -Racism (yes, models of color are lightened MOST of the time they get airbrushed, as a former model I have noticed this many of my photos and colleague photos).
    -Ignorance (Mainstream media is doing a great job at brainwashing people, especially young girls forming their persona. Ignorance is what happens when instead of educating and fomenting the youth's intellect, these young girls are being fed the idea that outside beauty [as depicted on the media 24/7] is what matters.)
    -Superficiality - (young girls thinking that they HAVE to look a certain way, if not, many end up with insecurities, eating disorders, mental disorders - in which some cases end up in suicide).
    -Miserable lives - (when people get caught-up in this FAKE image, from getting plastic surgeries to not being a good student/good parent/good person because they think their beauty is the main priority)

    I am very excited to have found this site, and I wish to communicate with fellow activists to make this case louder, and finally have disclaimers in airbrushed media.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago We need to accept who we are people/women are as perfect and not make an unrealistic model that no one can ever measure up to, causing so much suffering. Let's celebrate who we are!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think we should do away with airbrushing all together. The human body is a work of art and does not need improvement.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This images are not real. Real people is what we need in magazines, ads, etc. That will make everyone more self-loving and not trying to be something that is unreal and causes sickness like anorexia, bulimia, lack of self-love.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago There is no harm in having a disclaimer. You still can see the altered image.

  • 000004332 (United States) 9 months ago There is no harm in having a disclaimer. You are still able to view the altered image.

  • kunoichi (Australia) 9 months ago This certainly needs to be done for the sake of the sanity of all men and women, who shouldn't have to attempt to become something that is impossible.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Wonderful idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Wonderful idea

  • Anonymous 9 months ago There needs to be a disclaimer!!!

  • 000004337 (United States) 9 months ago Yes!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago As a woman who has battled body image disorder her whole life, I think this is a great idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It is essential to have these disclaimers. Women compare themselves to these unrealistic images and feel inadequate. Men see these images and compare their women and find them less "perfect." This fuels eating disorders, depression, and judgments based on lies.
    TRUTH IS ALWAYS MORE BEAUTIFUL THAN LIES.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago LETS DO IT.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I definitely think there should be a disclaimer. Most young girl do feel bad about their self esteem after seeing images of women in advertisements. That alone does not make them clinically depressed just constantly discouraged. It affects older women, too. We, and I'm speaking as a former very insecure teen and a current healthy, smart marathon running woman who still battles those media images, like to believe most of these images are airbrushed but it would be awesome to know for sure!
    Also this isn't good for the guys either. They need to feel confident in knowing what a real woman is.

  • bluage (United States) 9 months ago I looked up a defintion of the word "truth", and came across this: "something factual: the thing that corresponds to fact or reality." Not being able to distinguish between what is factual, or real, from what is not, can confusing, or disorienting, and could set up an individual to be mislead, especially as it applies to the physical appearance of things and people. As regards the idea of requiring "mandatory disclaimers" to alert, or warn people that digital manipulation of the human body was performed on an image, I believe it could help prevent so-called "consumers" from being victimized by ruthless advertising in the areas of cosmetic products and surgical procedures, fashion, pharmaceutical products for weight control, and other markets promoting the dubious benefits of “personal improvement” products that rely heavily on the purposeful and deliberate mis-representation of the human face and body to increase profits.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Not sure if it could really be done, but I'm glad for the subject being addressed. I'd love to see disclaimers. I think some of the comments here show how much people don't realize the power of images and the effect that they have on us as individuals and a society. We are all being denigrated by the distortion of women's images. Thanks for bringing this out!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yep. Fabulous idea. No brainer, really.

  • 000004407 (United States) 9 months ago hentschel = clueless And/Or hentschel = insensitive And/Or hentschel = "what an ass!"
    And/Or hentschel = very low IQ
    And/Or hentschel ..... thank you so much for illustrating why this idea is a good one!

  • 000004407 (United States) 9 months ago I'd like to know why that user's comment is allowed to STAY here. Mine in response wasn't polite but that's kind of my point.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes, let's do this. Business and advertising interests are wanting power over everything from your wallet to who our representatives should be.

    Not that you asked, but:
    Let's take them down a notch with this, then progress to opt-in instead of opt-out privacy policies. Neither my mind nor my data should be fooled with, seems to me.

  • Luisco (Spain) 9 months ago We have the right to know the truth. Just a disclaimer is good enough and is not that difficult to implement.

  • GD000004439 (Hungary) 9 months ago This would allow for distinguishing natural from fake. Great idea, but I would actually do the same on ALL published images, not only on advertisements.

  • GD000004440 (India) 9 months ago I feel people have the right to know if what they are seeing is real or not. simple as that. Manipulation of reality is just not right. If not for the body types or esteem issues but just for telling the truth. I support the idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great idea. Many people don't realise that that sort of manipulation has been done and it DOES affect the way we women and girls see our bodies. Of course it does, it's meant to make us go out and buy stuff to look more like the Barbie doll images we see. Claire, London.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Agreed.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree, as a woman who has seen models being idolized for years for their thin bodies and now seeing young girls being influenced by what they see on magazines and becoming depressed and literally dying to be what is considered perfect. Life isn't about how thin anyone is.....

  • Anonymous 9 months ago A mandatory declaimer would be a good start!

  • GD000004466 (Australia) 9 months ago definitely need this for our daughters

  • victorialrichardson90 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago It's not about cencorship, a simple disclaimer will not affect the 'art' created. I may however, raise awareness of the unrealistic expectation women feel they have to live up to in order to be desirable to males. Those of you who are complaining that this idea ruins art, have to think with a little more compassion for the effect that being bombarded with such art every day has on a woman's psychological health. The research is out there. What's worse? A tiny disclaimer, or the rise of mental health issues such as eating disorders and depression.....

  • ALabRat (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I'd support this idea because those viewers should be aware that this is not real. It is not a real image to aspire too. I have no issue with those that perform this art but that is what it is, a type of art, fantasy, and it should be labelled as such where it is possible for people mistake it for real.
    False aspirations can do people a lot of harm. Especially young women who see images of models as role models. To set an incredibly high bar for them that is not achievable for the vast majority is ultimately destructive. That is my point. That people who produce anything (images, sausages, BB guns or condoms) should have a social awareness about what they produce and educate people to their intended / designed use.

  • GD000004483 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Airbrushing seems a little dishonest.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Agree

  • Anonymous 9 months ago To all the guys out there who think this is a stupid idea...if you knew a fraction, just a small fraction, of the young women I know, of all the women I know, who suffer from low self-esteem, think they aren't good enough, spend their days feeling like they will never be loved or appreciated, because they don't, can't, will never look like these fake versions of what "the perfect woman" looks like - you would be as angry as I am. Airbrushed models may be "hotter" as one commentator said - but try to have a life with one of them. Men who want perfection in appearance (only) should look at their own imperfections. How many guys look like airbrushed MALE models? And how many women love them anyway. My guess is a lot of you will say who cares...well clearly you don't. When girls starve themselves, or damage themselves in a variety of ways, or spend money they don't have to try to please you, or are so bombarded by these images that they live in constant depression over it, then my suggestion is that you continue to drool and masturbate and dream of that perfect woman. You'll die alone. As you should.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago hentschel, that is why your only dates are with magazines...you should laminate them.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Personally, I think that seeing perfect apples in the supermarket every time we shop is not helping the matter. Children shy away from blemishes and irregularities thinking they will be horrid in some way,e .g. poisonous, taste horrid etc. So it's not just airbrushing, it's a culturally wide-spread problem

  • Cuddles (South Africa) 9 months ago I object because, as people have stated in the comments, they feel bad about their bodies even though they already know that an image is manipulated, so re-stating something they already know would not make a difference to their self-esteem. I would also object to preventing artists from manipulating photographs of people, because I would rather see aesthetic images in publications than realistic images (for the same reason that I would prefer to read fantasy novels and science fiction rather than political news or market reports.) No-one is stopping you from creating publications that don't use manipulated photographs, if you think there are enough people who would prefer that.

  • Cuddles (South Africa) 9 months ago I object because, as people have stated in the comments, they feel bad about their bodies even though they already know that an image is manipulated, so re-stating something they already know would not make a difference to their self-esteem. I would also object to preventing artists from manipulating photographs of people, because I would rather see aesthetic images in publications than realistic images (for the same reason that I would prefer to read fantasy novels and science fiction rather than political news or market reports.) No-one is stopping you from creating publications that don't use manipulated photographs, if you think there are enough people who would prefer that.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Airbrushing creates unfair expectations of women. Not only young girls become victims of this as married men and men in general, become dissatisfied with their partners causing the break up of many homes which ultimately impacts on society in general. Airbrushing also leads to many resorting to plastic surgery and or eating disorders in an attempt to meet the unrealistic demands made on them by people who are ignorant of the practice.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago yes

  • Anonymous 9 months ago yes

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I hate the fact that corporations are promoting a false sense of beauty and cheating consumers. Big corporations today find it fashionable to talk about integrity and character and compassion but don't live it. These ads show the REAL character of these companies. They also find it fashionable to talk about philanthropy and community building but are characterless on the other side. It's not just with how they present beauty but it goes beyond. It is epidemic and proper regulations are required to stop it.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Hentschel = empty upstairs

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Joe Moulton votes absolutely YES!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Totally agree with this, it's the least they can do

  • Anonymous 9 months ago yes

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I fully support this!

  • hhenderson (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I think it is important to society that we show real people rather than these over-edited versions of people. These images make women feel hideous and it makes men expect women to actually look like these big-eyed, shiny, plastic-skinned creatures who are so thin and tall that in reality they wouldn't be able to stand up successfully. It makes men want the impossible and women want to be the impossible.

  • bikky4u (India) 9 months ago I guess it’s not fair... they look better, but it’s a lie. At the end of the day it is the effort of the woman which shows the effect on their body and gives them the real happiness but not the Photoshop.

  • 000004581 (Mexico) 9 months ago Stop selling lies. Stop the distortion of beauty. Stop setting unreachable standards for beauty.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I am definitely for this!!

  • belmar (United States) 9 months ago Yes its true and as a society we need to do something about this

  • 000004595 (Slovakia) 9 months ago I agree because airbrushed ads without a disclaimer should fall under false advertising

  • Anonymous 9 months ago They do need to state the pictures have been photoshopped! Nowadays I don't trust picture anymore; to many tricks out there!

  • GD000004610 (Canada) 9 months ago I agree. This unrealistic state of perfection is a huge contributing factor in the epidemic of eating disorders and low self-esteem.

  • allie.dibenedetto (Canada) 9 months ago Hentschel: you only think they're hotter because it's been fed to you your whole life.

  • Jesample (United States) 9 months ago Cigarette warnings may not keep people from smoking, but they certainly bring awareness to dangers of nicotine... so I'm guessing that airbrush disclaimers would bring awareness to "fake" beauty and relieve girls of some of that feeling they don't measure up!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great idea, I vote for it.

  • 000004614 (Mexico) 9 months ago I agree, Airbrushing models is creating the wrong idea of what normal and healthy bodies should look like.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is a must! It is really just lying

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think this is a beautiful idea. More women need to know that they are beautiful just as they are.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is why suicides happen. People think that these models are real and perfect, but they don't realize that they're just a figment of a computer's imagination. Coming from a 15 year old girl who isn't the prettiest or thinnest who's seen a few people take their live because of not being perceived as beautiful and perfect. In reality, society is the ugly one.

  • 000004624 (Canada) 9 months ago This is brilliant, I think you can't avoid airbrushing in the industry but a disclaimer lets women, particularly younger girls know this isn't what was actually photographed.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Brilliant Idea. When girls who haven't even reached puberty yet are suffering body-image issues which lead to all sorts of harmful behaviours like eating disorders, I think we should take that as a big fat sign to act. Transparency through declaration of physical manipulation would be one incredibly helpful step in the right direction.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago this is important

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Sadly, the problem is an "effect" on young girls. Affect is a verb meaning "to alter our change" or a noun referring to a person's mood, but an effect is the result of something else, like airbrushing.
    This disclaimer is a necessary step to rebuild some reality for young people (mainly girls, but also men, viz. Axe commercials, etc.) to understand that advertising exists to sell, and these youth are being sold on this unrealistic body image.

  • Halie (United States) 9 months ago Everyone stop whining about hentschel, they're entitled to their opinion.
    And I think this is a great idea!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Love compells me to vote for this, the love natural beauty, the love of my own imperfect body & for the love of God we need to stop projecting false images of unattainable beauty & celebrate that which is real & authentic.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago My perception of myself changed drastically when I put down the magazines full of airbrushed advertisements and realized what real women actually look like. The confidence I gained when I stopped reaching for these impossible ideals changes my life around.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree that disclaimer should be mandatory. Will keep healthy confidence at reach.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree about disclaimer. Seeing something morphed and made to look perfect has negative effects towards the acceptance of reality

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It has a massive effect on what we view as important in the world and is just dishonest

  • HeatherBeach (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I object because it is dishonest and leads to us caring about things which simply don't matter

  • 000004664 (India) 9 months ago I think a disclaimer should be compulsory.

  • 000004664 (India) 9 months ago I think a disclaimer should be compulsory.

  • 000004664 (India) 9 months ago I think a disclaimer should be compulsory.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I object because what you see is not what you get....it deceives people, and must be creating unreal aspirations in young girls.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Lets love our best real self, our real bodies and minds, our unique looks, our diversity.

  • david.beacham.39 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago We should be told when we are looking at fakes, otherwise it is dishonest and misleading.

  • youkayn00b (United Kingdom) 9 months ago i support this because of the ridiculous arguments against it.

  • luszilou (Hungary) 9 months ago great idea, it would definitely help remind women what is a normal body/face and what isn't.

  • GWatTheCrib (United States) 9 months ago I object because I need Air Brushing regularly

  • udmartin (Uruguay) 9 months ago It makes women insecure about their bodies with fake and impossible goals.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I hate being deceived.

  • 000004721 (United States) 9 months ago This idea would be much more effective if along with the disclaimer the 'before' picture of the model was added. They do this when remodeling homes. The before and after pictures are always included.

  • og (United States) 9 months ago I don't like being deceived.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree with this 100%.

  • 000004725 (United States) 9 months ago I agree 100%. The airbrushing is giving young girls impossible body standards to try to meet.

  • kapplin (United Kingdom) 9 months ago We should all make a stand on this and adding a disclaimer is not going far enough. By all means hide a spot or something, but making someone look like someone else is ridiculous. Let us have natural, healthy looking models for clothes and makeup and not someone elses idea of what a "perfect" woman should look like.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Bring it on! When people spend MORE time with other people instead of in front of media box, then this idea will seem as sad as it REALLY is. In the meantime, let people know when advertising that this thing you are putting out is not an actual human being.

  • 000004735 (Canada) 9 months ago Some people have called airbrushing art, or that people know they're airbrushed or touched up.. I'm 20 years old and have grown up not knowing this or the full extent of this until now. Destroying the natural beauty of someone to try and con people into thinking that that is what "real beauty is" is disgusting and is no more art than someone shitting on paper. The beauty industry has made me feel terrible about myself because I can NEVER look like any of these half-human half-computerized bimbos. I hope this goes through,

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Wow, I knew they were airbrushed, but I didn't know it was THAT much.....making their legs longer, eyes bigger, nose smaller, but and belly smaller? Too much. I'm all for the disclaimer.

  • SinginJJ (United States) 9 months ago Wow, I knew models were airbrushed to look thinner, but after watching the video I just did while the airbrushing was done, it's RIDICULOUS! Making their eyes bigger, nose smaller, but smaller, waist thinner, changing their color and making their LEGS LONGER?! Gimme a BREAK! I'm all for the disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago henstchel: you and everyone who supports this thought is the reason why so many little girls have distorted body images and resort to eating disorders to change their body size. and also why little boys (including yourself seemingly) have misguided beliefs and understandings of what is beautiful and what should be appreciated.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Young girls are constantly bombarded with images of unrealistic standards of beauty, which results in low-self esteem, eating disorders and other negative impacts on mental health

  • Anonymous 9 months ago While nothing is wrong with finding a person beautiful, airbrushing/photo-shopping, etc. end up creating a false and utterly unobtainable standard of beauty when when coupled with the mass-media, has the effect of telling men that THIS is the woman they should be looking for, and the real women in their lives aren't worthy of their notice (the bar has been raised far beyond reality) and tells women that they can never be good enough - with or without a man...ultimately this objectification (and sexualization) facilitates eating disorders, smoking/drug use (to stay thin), dangerous cosmetic surgery, depression, and can contribute to pornography and human/sexual trafficking...

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes, this is an amazing idea! It could help many young woman.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I don't see the benefit in advertising to real people by using fake people. When I see a clothing advertisement with a Barbie looking model, all I think is how that wouldn't fit me or probably wouldn't look good on me. It seems like a poor advertising technique on top of being demoralizing.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Lets go one step further and ban airbrushing altogether for the detrimental effect is had on young women and on men's expectations.

  • eric.kuhne (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Just discovered this ... and hope that the diversity of natural beauty isn't homogenised by retouching; not offered as a model of perfection that always appears so much less beautiful than the incomparable diversity of individual's own eccentric features.

  • eric.kuhne (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Perhaps there can be a reverse re-touching from cookie-cutter-stamped-out beauty to beauty with the variety of quirky flaws, imperfections, eccentrics, nuances, and manifestations of the hundreds of fractal muscles all tugging in response to their own emotions expressing themselves on their faces ... all of which reveal more about the complexity, incongruity, paradoxes, ingenuity, and genius of our soul's represented on our bodies' canvas.

  • michelle.neil1976 (Australia) 9 months ago I object to airbrushed models as they give everyone else (probably including the models themselves) an inferiority complex.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think advertisers are using more and more ways to fool people for buying their product. Somehow, it's part of their work, but it's giving a negative impact on the society. Young boys and girls are becoming more and more keen into transforming into the type of the figure they see on the advertisement. This not only has an impact on them physically, but mentally too. I strongly object this and this type of practice should come with a disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I don't want my daughter thinking she has to be anything like airbrushed models. It just isn't real and not a good example for her to follow. :( Real models are beautiful, especially the ones that don't look like skin and bones, but like real people, so use them. Give people an opportunity for a career and income and support the world appropriately and set real and proper examples for our children, rather than causing more eating disorders and suicides! :(

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think it would do some good.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Airbrushing on models in advertisements misguide us grossly. It should be stated clearly, if any ad is using that technique.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago There should be transparency so that people do not blindly follow the products supported by these airbrushed models.

  • 000004855 (India) 9 months ago I agree.

  • Aks (India) 9 months ago Seeing is believing and such ads and marketing is misleading younger generation

  • Anonymous 9 months ago We agree with the mandatory disclaimer regulation. There is nothing wrong with fake models, as long as everyone knows they are fake.

  • classkat (United States) 9 months ago it would help girls with self image demands of society

  • GD000004870 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I object because its not what one is seeing, such hypocrite adverts should be stopped and so do there products.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago disclaimer no brainer! absolutely support the proposal

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It actually makes more sense to highlight unedited photographs with the disclaimer rather than the edited. It should be know that more often than not, models are retouched majority of the time. I think that seemed a more likely thing to happen if anything, or a disclaimer stating that all images should be assumed retouched unless otherwise stated.

  • allymartelli (United States) 9 months ago Because no one should ever compare themselves to images of false realities

  • CharlotteZ (Sweden) 9 months ago I don't understand this discussion! We are all consumers and where we put our money is where the corporations will go.... so STOP supporting companies who do not show respect for all humans regardless of size, color, religion, gender or sexual preference. Companies or organizations who use airbrushed advertizing should simply lose their customers, clients, supporters... That simple! And we don't even have to discuss if the images are airbrushed or not - depicting people in a way that shows their body instead of their heart, brain or personality should be boycotted!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree 100% with a mandate on publishing disclaimers.

  • Micmousfan (United States) 9 months ago I agree. A disclaimer would at least increase awareness that so many photos have been altered.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago yes.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago yes.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I totally agree that images should state if they've been manipulated, and that the more awareness is raised and it's shown how unreal these images are, the more young impressionable girls won't compare themselves to a false reality.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It's false advertising.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It's false advertising.

  • 000004923 (Canada) 9 months ago I agree with having disclaimers, just as they have disclaimers for those mascara commercials where they say the product was used on false lashes. I think truth needs to come to advertisements. If your product doesn't work without using some kind of trickery to have to sell it, then don't sell it. And I think photoshopping models should be banned entirely.

  • whiterose (Australia) 9 months ago stop the illusions!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is an extremely important disclaimer to have, especially in such a way that children and young women will be able to see it prominently. Our youth are at such a risk for self-esteem issues as it is, and they are bombarded with ideas of what women should be, do and look like in order for anyone to pay attention to you. Children look at these pictures and aspire to be/look like them because everyone considers them beautiful, and what little girl doesn't want to be beautiful? Only the "Beauty" being portrayed to them is fake.

    -Strong believer that there SHOULD be disclaimers

  • Annahtubbs (United States) 9 months ago I think it's fair to have a disclaimer when things have been modified for advertising
    They have it on a bag of chips to tell you that the size may appear larger than the actual size

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Absolutely agree. When you are the mother of two teenage daughters, you will truly get an ugly reality check. Both of my daughters are tall, thin and gorgeous, but all they can see when they look in the mirror are flaws. This world is crashing quickly. One of my daughters already has an eating disorder and she is a long distance runner. She still thinks hat she is fat. I would vote for a disclaimer in a heartbeat!!!!!!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think airbrushed models are a terrible example to set for the younger generation

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree

  • serafinaPekkala (United Kingdom) 9 months ago hentschel live in reality mate!

  • psychosal (Ireland) 9 months ago It's an important idea. The argument of curtailing artists' free speech is a straw man. The point that our self esteem is being damaged, our expectations of ourselves have become unrealistic, that is real, and of great concern. But it must be accompanied by education and conversation with our young people (and with eachother, it's not just young people are falling prey to advertising, which is how its' being passed on to the next generation). It 's part of a solution, not THE solution. So why not do it?

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is common sense .. so it probably won't make it into law, but.. here's hoping!

  • pegorete (Brazil) 9 months ago I absolutely agree.

  • Cookie113 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago This is an excellent idea but I also fear, as others have commented, that the disclaimer will not stop a young, vulnerable mind feeling inadequate when faced with such impossible, polished models.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago As someone who grew up never feeling good enough and always feeling the constant pressure to be "perfect" I agree with this. So many people suffer from eating disorders and other disorders like that because of the horrible false image of perfection that we are told we need to obtain in order to be accepted by society.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago So where do i vote on this? Only a comment section??? I agree that there should be a mandatory disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think this should've been made manditory a long time ago - it was hard enough growing up with images in the 90's but as computer tools and programmes get more sophisticated we need to make sure children growing up in this world are not only aware of the manipulation of society by mass media and false imagary, but also build their own confidence with I think realistic body imagary would help : )

  • 000004987 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago The next generations should know the truth always, and understand you cant hold these air brushed images up to idolize, without knowing they are aspiring to a body image that is computer generated. Lets get this put in place for all airbrushing!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Airbrushing should be banned, it makes us all feel imperfect.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Totally agree, I want my daughter to grow up knowing whats real and whats fake...false body images are damaging to young girls

  • Anonymous 9 months ago When it comes to airbrushing - stop using it. It should not be used on any models. Using airbrushing on models for any ad is false advertising. We are fools. What is the matter with everyone.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I have no issue with this principle. It just means that models that can be used to produce material without the need for 'tweaks' will be able to charge 10 times more than anyone else, as the ads could run without the disclaimer. There is nothing wrong with Airbrushing, I wouldn't want it's use banned. That would be censorship and going the step too far. At the same time it isn't right to mislead people by presenting something in a way that simply isn't accurate. A little disclaimer would perhaps shake things up enough to stimulate or encourage the create types to come up with another option.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Video of how airbrushing changes things.

    Watch it.

    http://www.upworthy.com/see-why-we-have-an-absolutely-ridiculous-standard-of-beauty-in-just-37-seconds?g=3&c=ufb1

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think it is wrong to be airbrushing women on TV and magazines as it gives young girls a false image of what they should look like when its not even realistic!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago people need to know if what they are seeing in advertisements is real or altered

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is a great idea and should be real right now. Is like the composition in food, because, day by day, seems clearer that models on advertising (food) is not only "food", it has additives (Photoshop and else).

  • genTh (Canada) 9 months ago Until we deal with Wall St. and Madison Ave. we are not going to make the gap between 1% - 99% any smaller. We may try to change the balance but if we ever wish to achieve an Earth Golden age it may just be a pipe dream. I fear this is the fate of mankind. But who said our species will ever remain dominant. We are not gods

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think that the addition of a disclaimer would help with the negative effects on body image young girls suffer. I think I'm a reasonably well-educated, intelligent person, and I genuinely had no idea that this happened, especially to such an extent, until recently in my late twenties. I spent a lot of my teenage years wondering why I didn't look like the people in magazines, on the TV, etc. If I'd seen a disclaimer it would have made me feel a lot better about myself/stopped my ceaseless quest to try and alter my aesthetics to an impossible ideal instead of loving who I am and taking care of myself and my looks as I am. I think that maybe this isn't enough, and airbrushing itself should be toned down, but at least this is a step in the right direction, working at the problem in pieces , rather than bullishly trying to take on a powerful industry that is so ingrained in so many aspects of our lives.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Agreed.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago don't airbrush - it cuases mental ill health. In young people especially. People get their perception of the real distorted and when the real doesn't match their perceptions it feels wrong, causing distress. Particulary because they feel they don't fit in or are welcomed by a world that no longer mirrors them.

  • Heya (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I agree with the comments that most people are aware that the images are airbrushed - but by how much? That's what we need to know. Maybe introducing a universal scale of the extent of the airbrush on the image should be put at the bottom of the page in the form of a code like a letter or number. Just like film ratings, where a 15 indicates the film is recommended to ages 15 and above and then additionally it explains what the film may contain to make it a 15. It would take a long time but it would help.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I object 100% because it gives young girls the idea that they have to look like that (9i.e perfect in every way) &, therefore, encourages eating dosorders & has seen sales of Cosmetic Surgery rise dramatically-in fact I think 'Airbrushing' should be banned altogether, as a Woman' natural beauty shine though with or without make-up alone.

  • GD000005015 (United States) 9 months ago This is genius

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Airbrushing natural features of a real human body creates unrealistic expectations and pressures upon both females and males. Why can't natural beauty be celebrated more? A disclaimer is a step in the right direction but still there needs to be more done to prevent low self-esteem caused by faking what we are shown in advertisements.

  • GD000005022 (Canada) 9 months ago I agree!! We all know that they are heavily make-up'd etc to begin with, but it is a good reminder for anyone and everyone looking that it is fiction. Seems men and women, young and old alike too easily forget...and it's affecting self esteems, sex lives and the "realities" of an imperfect world

  • 000005023 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago this could have so many social benefits

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I believe that women should be portrayed as they are not as false, edited skeletons. Everything you see today in the media is edited to form the ideal - this is a false representation of women and should not be allowed - these ideal's create negativity on all people, not just young girls.

  • Gnq (United Kingdom) 9 months ago The cult of 'perfection' kills.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think its about time someone addressed this because it's as a young person myself, it makes me very uncomfortable when i talk to my friends and they show me picture of a beautiful airbrushed model and they say to me ' i need to look like her' or 'i need that body'. Its absolutely ridiculous, showing these unachievable bodies of unreal women.

  • pamela.thompson.7 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago A disclaimer should be shown with all of these types of photographs as it lets people know that the models themselves are not perfect. I've just watched a video demonstrating the airbrushing of models and she ended up looking like a plastic doll. That's not normal and its time the industry stopped trying to force false ideals on people. It has negative effects on young girls and boys as anorexia is on the rise in boys and men. The media should be focusing on HEALTHY looking people not making all the girls look like anorexics and giving the impression that this is how women should look. Lets celebrate the diversity of women's (and men's!) bodies.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago SHE DIED OF PERFECTION. ...... <------ THIS IS WHERE OUR GENERATION OF TEENAGE GIRLS IS HEADING

  • CJD1965 (United States) 9 months ago I agree because young children in particular have no way of knowing of something is airbrushed or not.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Natural is beautiful

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I am totally with this, having personally experienced an eating disorder as a result of these campaigns not only do girls have to battle with their weight but the idea of becoming "perfect" and magazines are constantly misrepresenting beauty so we should address the harm we are causing now!

  • 000005035 (Canada) 9 months ago I support this 100% - my daughter would get a clear message that these images are manipulated and a lie. Poor body image and girl's obsession with looks is an epidemic.

  • GD000005037 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Not everyone knows that models are airbrushed. In many so-called developing countries, where the implications of the mass media are not well understood yet, people believe what they see. My in-laws, etc., have very limited understanding of digital manipulation technology. The effect on young women in these countries is particularly worrying.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago agreed!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago agreed!

  • GD000005040 (Canada) 9 months ago @hopefulgirl - agreed

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Theres no such thing as a perfect body! Everyone should love their bodies as is

  • Anonymous 9 months ago That is exactly what Unsung Lilly is talking (singing) about in this video, check it out! http://youtu.be/-Q53J1nHB8k

  • Anonymous 9 months ago stop airbrushing, save natural beauty

  • Anonymous 9 months ago What is sooo wrong with the human body that we have to alter it beyond natural recognition to appreciate it? This gives a horrible message in an identity challenged world. I am all for natural and photoshop is just going to have to find another outlet for its creativity!

  • 000005059 (Canada) 9 months ago stop airbrushing, enjoy natural beauty

  • 000005059 (Canada) 9 months ago stop airbrushing, enjoy natural beauty

  • Lightrunner (Canada) 9 months ago This is a very good idea! People take media unquestioningly and so many people believe the images they see are true. Most often they have been manipulated in some way and I feel people have a right to know. If we really understood how much of media is just fantasy and illusion we might just start reexamining our thoughts on reality!

  • 000005063 (United States) 9 months ago should show true body..it is causing lot of ill impact on our society.

  • 000005069 (Canada) 9 months ago Agree!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree that photoshopped or airbrushed pictures should come with disclaimers. I think many people know it happens but most don't realize the extent.

  • 000005075 (United States) 9 months ago Women and girls need to know that what they are seeing is not what the majority of real women look like. This is a brilliant idea. 100% support.

  • GD000005084 (Belgium) 9 months ago Yes, let's do this!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I like the original girl.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I am a photographer and I agree with this proposal as today even simple photography of normal people for everyday use or small business - the clients though not paying much require and ask for airbrushing, photoshopping etc. The women in particular are rarely happy until they look like something that they have seen in a magazine which is a shiny fake plastic look to their skin. PS'ing excessively is very damaging for society's perception of beauty and self worth.

  • sharonlisadunkerley (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I object because by airbrushing models, you are creating the impossible beauty. A girl cannot grow a longer neck, or longer legs, and there for you are saying to her 'you are inadequate' she can try to loose weight to look like the model... but why, when she is totally acceptable as she is! And also more so, because the model was totally acceptable as she was, so why change her. Girls need to embrace their bodies and love themselves for who they are, not what the world says they should be.

  • shuggs (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I agree with this. Nobody wants to read a false article in a newspaper while being conned into thinking that it is true. We get offended by this because we know then how mass media can easily manipulate us. Whether it's in plain black and white text that brainwashes people, false imagery of an 'idol' is just if not more as frighteningly powerful.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Sports people can't take steroids - models shouldn't be airbrushed

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree because it gives a wrong image to everyone as to what normal people and especially woman should be expected to look like. Not everyone knows it's fake and it just puts unnecessary pressure on people to strive for a look only very very few people can achieve without computer manipulation

  • val (Canada) 9 months ago agree with the disclaimer...

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think it is wrong to give the kids today a false sense of what beauty is. Airbrushing should not be allowed.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great idea so that women of all ages do not suffer from the negative effects of such manipulation.

  • Vanrustle (Russian Federation) 9 months ago totally accept that. It happened that i wrote the same in my FB account 3 days ago and now see your idea. Genius.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Even being aware that they are airbrushed still makes me feel the need to look as perfect. I would agree with this for sure, and also perhaps we can start pushing for less or no airbrushing at all?? It's nice to be able to erase some zits sometimes, I will admit! But airbrushing the entire body and lengthening limbs is insane!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Airbrushing to such amounts that happens today seriously harms young and even older womens confidence and lifestyle- time to stop - at least tone it down!

  • 000005132 (Italy) 9 months ago I see people objecting because they think this is about banning airbrushing, but it's not about that! We're talking about having a disclaimer on airbrushed pictures- I believe that would not only be helpful in changing beauty standards, but also be really educational for everyone.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago The right to be informed! I vote yes

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is an important step towards a society of better balanced and more content individuals. Images are manipulated to sell us an ideal of something that does not exist so that we spend money in vain endlessly trying to achieve an impossible goal.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It should stop because many young girls and women are taking drastic even dangerous measures to reach goals that
    aren't real. If they want to airbrush blemishes that's fine but they shouldn't falsify every aspect of that person, natural beauty is beautiful too!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes it should stop because women and young girls take drastic and even dangerous measures to obtain something that most often isn't real. To airbrush blemishes away is one thing but to falsify the entire photo is rediculous! Natural is beautiful too!!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago truth in advertising - these pictures are misleading. misleading or misrepresentation is a form of lying. 'nuf said. can we simply use the truth in advertising laws to stop these misrepresentations? What is the difference?

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think its a great way to shatter the fantasy depictions of what people really look like in reality.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree that we need to stop making people 'look perfect' and giving EVERYONE a false idea of what beauty really is. Men want a woman who does not exist, ignoring the ones that do exist while little girls and young women alike become troubled, everything from self image issues to self-hatred to more extreme cases of depression, sometimes ending in suicide. It makes me sick that this is one of the many ways our society endeavors to destroy itself.

  • morgylaw (Canada) 9 months ago I would like to point out that it does in fact say, "simple step in the right direction" meaning that it is not going to be the solution, but it is another step closer.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I had had problems with my weight my whole life just and because this perfect-manipulated-computer created images!!! Stop pushing fake perfection and let the true natural real beauty flow!

  • Zol23 (United States) 9 months ago I had have health problems due to fight my weight and dont eat well because all this fake- manipulated- computer created images of what a perfect body should be! Stop doing this! Stop killing beautiful teenagers every year because of your sick obsession of how a woman should look!!!! Real beauty comes in all sizes and from inside to outside! Lets do this mandatory now!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It has already had a devastating impact on young women, teenagers wanting botox?! Photo manipulated images as standard is lying. So it is false advertising. Stop lying to us

  • Anonymous 9 months ago agree

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Our 13 year old compares herself to these televised images of perfection, no shock that she always feels like she's losing! Time to publicise real beauty, pictures of real women and girls who eat well, exercise and take care of themselves. The airbrushing industry puts a great deal of pressure on young girls and older women alike. We all want to be the best we can be. If you shower us with these unrealistic ideas of what we should look like. We are all aiming for the unachievable and subsequently feeling like we are not good enough. Low self esteem is most apparent these days. The nations women need boosting and uniting! The advertising we ENDURE has the opposite effect and brings a negative warped view on oneself and creates a divide between the sexes.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I feel very strongly as a CBT psychotherapist that all airbrushing without before 'real' shots need to be banned. children are adults are growing up with unrealistic views on what they and others should look like- such low esteem is costing (UK) billions as I am treating people each day who are comparing themselves to unreal people- it should carry (airbushed models) a severe health warning. We are damaging our nations and promoting fakeness whilst we should be nurturing and promoting genuinity

  • 000005220 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago see my comment (cbt therapist) just watched a commercial with the lady shown pre and after, it is not a total ban but it shows the picture before and after altering- also giving the mind also to adjust to what I am now about to see is make believe and a fantasy

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Beauty cannons are doing great harm to teenagers and girls today

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree with this principle but there is another side to the coin. Body censorship is preventing people from knowing what people really look like. In consequence many, probably most, young people get their body knowledge from the pornography industry. It is no wonder that the outcomes are so appalling in the more prudish western countries.

  • WillieClark (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I fully support this idea to make it a legal requirement to state explicitly that the photo/image has been edited if only to draw attention to the unrealistic sexist ideal that the fashion/advertising industry promotes to women. I'm a man and I have demonstrated taking my own face (late 40's and a bit scruffy) and transforming it into a passable 20 something glamorous woman (faked up cosmetics Advert) to demonstrate to students I teach Photoshop to, the inherent falsehoods that are being marketed to them..they are often quite taken aback at the transformations that digital imaging can achieve. I ask them to question every fashion/advertising shot featuring a woman/women and ask, is it real, does she really look like that, why have they manipulated it in that way?

  • Anonymous 9 months ago We are psychologically trained to base our self-analysis on the "normal" we see all around us. When we are bombarded with a false-normal, our self-analysis is faulty and we see ourselves as flawed and try to fix what is not broken or accept the lie that we are sub-par. Make sure the disclaimer isn't limited to female models. They airbrush and enhance male models just as much.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I vote for the manditory disclaimer when airbrushing is used.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I think this should be done, especially because our daughters are getting the wrong idea on what a beautiful body really looks like - they don't know what photoshop is or airbrushing they just want to look like the girl on the cover

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I support this idea at 100 %!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This disclaimer idea is a great one. It does not ban "artistic license"; but rather protects teen girls from thinking they are not good enough the way they are, thus increasing their risk for suicide. It educates young males that see such images about unrealistic expectations, as well.
    I wonder, will they have this disclaimer under the Photoshop-altered photos in Playboy, as well? When I worked in digital imaging twenty years ago, I remember them Photoshop-ing images of Demi Moore for Playboy. I think even she would shudder to think of all the people that saw both her before and after images.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Wonderful idea this should defiantly be a law not just a proposal

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Nothing compares with natural beauty. Airbrushing is unnecessary.

  • 000005273 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Being a fairly confident and comfortable person, and being fully aware that airbrushing does exist and that almost any female celebrity/ actress/ popstar would be pretty much unrecognisable if we saw them in true daylight, I personally don't feel that I am too affected by airbrushing. However, I know that I am a minority in that respect, and can't even begin to describe the damage that airbrushed images cause for teenage girls who aspire to look like them because they are their role models, they are successful, they are what most teenage girls wish to become. Young girls shouldn't be spending so much time doing their hair/ make-up/ nails/ tans... I worry what this will do to the world... as generations become more and more obsessed with looks, they will become less and less interested in reading a book or doing their homework.

  • krishnagiri123 (United States) 9 months ago Good idea..

  • Anonymous 9 months ago ALL FOR IT! BUT I AM MORE FOR A BAN ON AIRBRUSHING MODELS!!! A VISUAL OF WHAT THEY REAL ARE WOULD BE MORE AFFECTIVE ;)

  • 000005295 (Canada) 9 months ago This is a no-brainier, really. Truth, trust, and clarity are pretty fundamental to the success of human societies. Undeclared manipulation of images that purport to represent a persons is just detrimental. I have seen my women family and friends struggle with body image issues too much not to want to see a change!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This proposal sets a horrible precedence. The advertising industry has the freedom of free speech #1, second this model went into the photo shoot completely undone, no makeup and hair a mess. All the artists have done is shown the potential that this woman possesses and has chosen not too. Third where will this stop, me trying to explain to my two year old the disclaimer that Barbies are actually not representative of the female form. Or why not make CNN put a disclaimer that they are not reporting the news but rather a biased agenda. This is communist propaganda that is trying desperately to make mediocrity the acceptable norm.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes, I agree.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Absolutely, lets also put the same disclaimer on the Mona Lisa and any other work of art that represents the female form. That way people understand that ALL art is not representative of the female form. Photoshop is a tool for artists just like the paintbrush or a pencil. You object because you fail the ambition to achieve a higher standard for yourself.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Please do this! It's about time that young people stopped being made to feel inadequate.

  • 000005341 (Italy) 9 months ago agreed

  • Anonymous 9 months ago One trick for all of you to do: study history of painting. You will se that what was considered a perfect female body in the XVIIth century was extremely different from what is considered a perfect female body today. Knowing that would help the whole world relativise today's concept of perfection.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago And the perfect form was probably unattainable back then as well. Perfection the word in itself means "the condition, state, or quality of being free or as free as possible from all flaws or defects." The perfection you describe in old paintings is the artists version of perfection, and it was only attainable by a few women during the time due to social order and income it was not the average. Same as today this perfection is only attainable by a few and these few are looked down upon for "being free of defects and flaws as possible". Next time you are cramming McDonald's or some other fast food down your throat ask yourself if this is helping you reach perfection or do I not have the willpower to achieve something that others have sacrificed personally for. This self righteous attitude that everyone should look the same and that is considered perfect is garbage, that is considered normal. The average/normal american woman 5' 4", 144lbs, size 12-14, and is pear shaped instead of hourglass. The women that are "perfect" and these artists are not the villains, the problem is within our society that feels slighted or bullied because they can't look like that, this is a personal problem of the, dare I say, the "fat". Your body reflects how you take care of it, it is impossible to look like a lump of walking lard if you don't ingest garbage.

  • robertoaymes (Mexico) 9 months ago Completely agree. There should be no reason why a digitally or manually altered body that is being sold as “real” should not present a disclaimer indicating that it is, at least to a certain extent, a fake, manipulated, image.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago The largest problem with this bill is it is a complete waste of money!!! Even IF you got it through the Congress, Senate, and signed by the President it would never ever make it through the Supreme Court due to Freedom of Speech. Use this money for something worth while like paying for poor peoples Obamacare.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I met this really pretty girl at the bar this weekend and before we went home for the night she handed me a business card that stated "not my natural hair color or length, nose has received plastic surgery, breasts are smaller than they appear (water bra), waist has been surgically modified, and I am using special underpants to make my butt look tighter". Lets get real for a minute reality is what each individual makes of it, disclaimers on ads is not going to do anything to make the world a better place. Lets call this campaign for what it is, a smear campaign to have women who want to look like that but don't, feel better about themselves. This world would be so much better off if we just worried about ourselves and if you didn't like something then don't buy it. You don't have to buy these magazines or let your teenage daughters look at them in your home. This education comes from home not government regulation.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This is a very good idea. On every manipulated photo there should be the statement, that it has been transformed/changed, esp. advertising & human bodies

  • GD000005375 (United States) 9 months ago I like this idea -- could we have it in a readable, visible font size, though -- so people REALLY see it

  • Anonymous 9 months ago VERY GOOD IDEA -- HOW ABOUT IT NOT BE IN tiny letters NO ONE NOTICES

  • GD000005375 (United States) 9 months ago EXCELLENT IDEA -- bigger font than most disclaimers would be nice, but maybe you have to start somewhere

  • GD000005375 (United States) 9 months ago EXCELLENT IDEA

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I am a visual artist and have studied the human figure for years.. I do not like Photoshop because its mathematical based tools make a photo look plastic. A little use of them work ok ... too much makes a image look like cartoon. A camera image itself is flawed because of it mathematical based single lens perspective. Nothing is better than a Human seen with Human eyes... everything else is illusion. We need to hold to teaching the difference between illusion and what is real. I do not create images of the human figure because I am not interested in illusions or dogma. I like the idea of the disclaimer. People need to find learn and truth for all images.

  • Sugarlips999 (United Kingdom) 9 months ago I agree with airbrushing to give a clear complexion but not to make the body slimmer.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I've been aware of airbrushing models for over a dozen year. I have yet to see an ad use a disclaimer (at least a disclaimer in large enough print to read, and on tv screen long enough to read).

  • Anonymous 9 months ago good idea

  • 000005415 (Canada) 9 months ago I don't like airbrushing because it distorts how people look. Already there is far too much emphasis on looks. Air brushing only make the domination of women worse. Women have the right to lok the way they do and to be respected for who they are, not who somebody else wants them to be.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes. I agree that disclaimers must be provided... what you see is not always what you get.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes, yes and yes!

  • GD000005423 (Canada) 9 months ago I think this is a great idea :)

  • Anonymous 9 months ago The transformation is unbelievable! For so many years my daughter wished to look like them, no she is 23yrs old and knows how photoshop works. She now encourages her 2 young cousins not to believe what you see. She has even given the a demonstration to show how different we can look after just 10 minutes of manipulation.

  • 000005424 (United States) 9 months ago I wholeheartedly agree. The disclaimer is important for the precise reasons you have stated.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree with " let's make the airbrushed models disclaimer as big and as ugly as the warnings on cigarette packages" No need to explain the reasons.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Should be mandatory

  • Anonymous 9 months ago By law this practice should be stopped. It is false advertising (although we know that most advertising is exaggerated) plus it has a negative effect on younger females.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes, I think there should be a mandatory disclaimer!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I totally agree. If companies are confident enough that their products are good, then they shouldn't have to advertise them in a false light!

  • KirstenSnow (Canada) 9 months ago I agree because the problem isn't women being dumb-think about it. Yes, part of it is the woman choice, but think about it-if there was a problem with more men getting surgeries to make their penis bigger because of pornography, what would you do? Yes, encourage the men to not listen to media, but the main problem right there would be the influence of pornography. I think that airbrushing young people is, indeed, a form of art, but a rather harmful one. I have no problem with makeup, but airbrushing? Really?

  • Anonymous 9 months ago As someone who has been in the advertisment business and the digital alteration side of artwork I think this is a brilliant idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It also affects men and their self image. Great idea!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I vote yes, make it mandatory.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago @hentschel It doesn't mean they wouldn't be airbrushed. It just means that if it is airbrushed, it would say so. So in the end you can still have your airbrushed models but it would help young girls realize that almost every model is photoshopped so they can stop hating themselves so much. Overall it does not affect you in any way but it benefits many other people in a good way so I don't really understand why you would object... :/ ???

  • Anonymous 9 months ago As someone hoping to get my ACA in Photoshop in the next few months, I don't know everything but I know a lot about what Photoshop can do to an image. Throughout my experience I have changed race, hair colour, size of body parts, etc, etc, etc. It is something artistic that I enjoy doing but if it is unknown that the image is Photoshopped to others, they may take it seriously and it could cause serious negative effects. If all images were advertised as Photoshopped from the very first ad that was ever edited, young girls would have never started feeling self-conscious. Photoshop slowly made it's way into society without us even knowing for many many years so our brains were tricked into thinking that it was real. And now when we see images that we know are edited, we still can't get the notion out of our minds that it is real, all based on our first impressions. I agree with this for the new generation but I still wish something like this was made when Photoshop was first created for our generation. Don't get me wrong, I love Photoshop but I really don't see the harm in letting people know when publically displayed images are edited. I don't think it will help our generation much because we've already spent years thinking things are real when they aren't but I hope this will help people in the future, to grow up knowing it's all fake from the moment they are born.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago No wonder many females go through this stage... they want us to be beautiful but their beauty is fake so it's unachievable.

  • Pegasus302 (Canada) 9 months ago Here's an issue no one talks about. It's all about the self esteem getting damaged because you are not beautiful. What is happening to the beautiful people because of this? It's all perception, reinforcement and lack of punishment you know. I"m sure they will block anything (the industry) because of the money they are making. duh? don't you ever think? whenever I have written to someone they don't answer, mum's the word. Here is my story, I am wasting my time. You are wasting everyone's time if you are just here to blurb about yourself and not answer anyone else. This is not a dump. Here is my story. I was beautiful and hated it. I was assaulted and raped daily for a long period of time. I was harassed constantly. I was violated in everyway. guys wouldn't leave me alone and things got rough. They got their way, I didn't. No one wanted to talk to me, no one wanted to hire me, as soon as the saw me they thought it was right that they should punch me and rape me. It was laughable to them. I had a baby and it was stolen. I can't get the police to do anything. Sure everyone talks, no one cares. everyone is isolated and lonely and don't lift a finger for anyone. And then everyone has the nerve to call me a liar when I tell my story. A lot of things have gotten worse not better. It is inaction that is the cause of problems in everything. No one was arrested by the way, ever, I have been diagnosed with 'mental illness', not PTSD, offered medication and pretty much hit the road. Things need to improve people have to stop thinking the old way is inhumane, get with it.

  • Pegasus302 (Canada) 9 months ago DID ANYONE READ MY COMMENT? SEE ABOVE. NO ONE TALKS ABOUT THE HARM IT CAUSES TO PEOPLE WHO ARE ACTUALLY GOOD LOOKING. WHEN PEOPLE TALK ABOUT 'THESE GIRLS' GETTING KILLED, NONE LEFT, IT BECOMES A CONVERSATION PIECE AND I REALLY RESENT IT. I RESENT THE LACK OF ATTENTION MY PROBLEMS ARE GETTING; A LACK OF SELF ESTEEM? TRY CHRONIC SEVERE PTSD FROM REPEATED RAPES AND BASHINGS. I RESENT THE UNCARING PEOPLE WHO JUST TALK AND DON'T LIFT A FINGER TO HELP. PEOPLE HAVE TOO MANY QUESTIONS, THEY CAN'T FIGURE THINGS OUT FOR THEMSELVES. THEY HAVE TO HAVE A MEDIA MONKEY TO DO IT FOR THEM. HERE'S YOUR MONKEY DUMMIES. THINK FOR ONCE. YOU ARE PATHETIC.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I object because a model's appearance, be it altered or not, shouldn't be such a huge concern in society. As for it causing negative effects on women and specifically, young girls, you must understand that it is up to you whether you emphasize to women and children that these are not what the people actually look like. That they are altered beyond recognition and that you should in no way feel it necessary to look like them. To require a disclaimer would do very little or nothing at all considering the fact that any magazine can put it in the tiniest of fonts. And trust me, they will...

  • Anonymous 9 months ago @hentschel it's not saying to make it illegal to airbrush, it's saying to put a disclaimer under it saying that it isn't 100% real

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Being a model, myself, I see the harm it does to people everyday. Involved with this industry, even I think that this is right, because I see my friends go through anorexia and bulimia to be like that girl in the advertisement - who isn't even real! Most models start very young, a lot are signed at around 14 because of their "smaller" frames. We need to change the image of modeling. The face of America should be like AVERAGE Americans. ---Cheyenne from NYC

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great Initiative!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I strongly oppose airbrushing and touch ups done to any photography because the ultimate motivation is to sell a product and therefore make more money. I find it sad that money is determining false beauty. No wonder society has low self esteem because it is almost impossible to attain such " beauty" unless there is great wealth involved and even then some things turn out with devastating results.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Just like cigarettes, there should be disclaimers on products that create harmful effects. These models are not real, giving young girls unrealistic expectations of themselves.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago It should be documented...

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Most women look at these models as perfection…let's be honest - no one is perfect.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Hentschel is missing the point. I suspect that this is one of many points that he misses. I like the idea of a disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I absolutely agree with a "mandatory disclaimer.
    Elizabeth McAllister.

  • 000005536 (United States) 9 months ago I agree because although some people may be aware of photo editing, having mandated disclaimers would eventually change the way we look at "perfection" and help the next generation to love themselves for who they are. It would pose a productive challenge to the industry to NOT edit photos.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago excellent

  • Anonymous 9 months ago There should definitely be a mandatory disclaimer.

  • 000005540 (United States) 9 months ago Its the least we can do. Deception in advertising is no secret, but this is one practice that is harmfully affecting the self image and self confidence of entire generations of young women.

  • 000005540 (United States) 9 months ago Its the least we can do. Deception in advertising is no secret, but this is one practice that is harmfully affecting the self image and self confidence of entire generations of young women.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago One vote for reality. No thanks to the illusions.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago A disclaimer wouldn't disallow the practice, just inform people that what they're looking at has been manipulated. Truth in advertising!

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree with the idea that there should be limitations on airbrushing ads. Especially those aimed at teens. I don't think using a disclaimers would help much. That being said, anything to help young women feel better about themselves, I am all for! It's worth it to save even one girl from hating herself and doing something drastic.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This should absolutely be passed. Such a good idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Agree.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree in 100%

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great! Voting for my daughter /nieces

  • bryttanynikol (United States) 9 months ago I love this idea.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I vote up this idea

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Of course there should be a disclaimer. This will decrease the psychosocial stress of physical looks through and unhealthy harsh diets and habits to get an unreal body. Depression rate with decrease also and so on...
    This should also apply to restaurant chains, fast foods, etc. Because you pay for what they advertise and get what they want. Most of the time doesn't even resemble the picture.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago This wouldn't really change a thing because the REAL models look the same in person, with no makeup, on instagram, etc. Most of the airbrushing is done on celebrities. That's why there is all those CELEBS with no makeup. Adriana Lima with no makeup sweating after a workout still looks as beautiful as her in a VS Campaign.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago The unperfect ones always are the more interesting looking ones. The perfect ones are the boring ones.

  • Shady (France) 9 months ago Grown up people realize the models are air brushed. What matters is to not give a false view of reality to the youngest. I've seen to many girls struggling to lose weight, too many boys mocking girls with small breasts because it was not the image spread on TV (what they think is reality), thus it was "not normal".

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Great idea, it is a step in the right direction.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago I agree that a disclaimer should be applied. The photographers and even the models are artists, the airbrushers are artists, but we as a whole don't see it as art. We see it as an unobtainable goal. So yes, we should disclaim that these images are art and in no way represent a real body ideal. They are pretty to look at, though.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago OK

  • Anonymous 9 months ago The truth is all there is.

  • Arkannor (United States) 9 months ago I agree with this in concept but not entirely. If a commercial for a restaurant must use a real menu item, then a picture of a model should not be permitted to be altered to portray an unrealistic image. That being said, if a car company is allowed to edit the lighting and white balance of a picture of one of their cars, the same should be allowed for models, so long as the physical appearance of the individual has not been altered unrealistically.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Yes we need a disclaimer for any modification, whether it is a photo editing or genetics, or plastic surgery, or harmone treatment.

  • Anonymous 9 months ago Perhaps this would enact a global Hawthorne Effect. Knowing that their cover will be blown anyways, models and editors won't bother to manipulate the photos and we can all get along with realistic view points about the human body. Otherwise we can continue to worship an unattainable and unrealistic ideal which will never exist in reality. Cool.

  • 000005671 (United States) 9 months ago a moral and ethical necessity for the health and wellbeing of girls, women, and those that love and are effected by them.

  • Noraic (United Kingdom) 9 months ago Excellent, this should happen anyway, it's shocking it hasn't yet.

  • Irkajava (United States) 8 months ago I hate the fact that thousands of women spend exorbitant amounts of money, and risk their lives to get very insane surgeries, sucking out or off large portions of fat and sewing a woman back up, just hoping they don't get huge infection, the biggest health risk of plastic surgery..usually they feel better, but sadly, even with stomach reduction surgery, most people slowly return to their normal size once the original weight loss slips, Many force their stomach to stretch back to the previous size almost. It's possible. All of this dangerous behavior, as well with botox, injections and silicon, to name a mere few of the procedures that people have done to themselves just to be beautiful. Because of airbrushing, people die, hate themselves; even teenagers who obviously don't need to worry about this type of thing are participating in this dangerous behavior as well. Please require a mandatory disclaimer stating that this image of this model has been manipulated on a computer. Thank you for considering this request.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago YES

  • Anonymous 8 months ago YES

  • denisse.lopezsepulveda (Mexico) 8 months ago All of this kind of advertisements make us believe that womens like this reallynexist when it doesnt and even worst little girls try to look like them..

  • Anonymous 8 months ago those fake models really frustrate real people.

  • 000005750 (Macedonia) 8 months ago @ waylonsweat: airbrushing is not art. Its a tool to help you sell a product and nothing more. This comes from am a graphic designer and a photographer! Thank you!

  • cecyklink134 (United States) 8 months ago i agree because air brushing creates a false perfection in people that does not exists, no one is perfect everyone has a least one flaw and air brushing makes people compete with a false looks thus creating low self esteem. These advertisements is distributed throughout the whole world and it effects us all unconsciously especially the younger girls. Airbrushing creates a beautiful fat lie not the reality of true beauty.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Great idea! Let's embrace flaws as part of humanity, and accept that beauty is not just about being size 0, having high cheek bones and flawless skin.

  • AlanaP (Brazil) 8 months ago I agree. The power to produce/distribute images - photos and videos - that become a model for the whole society, in the current social (dis)organization, is detained by a small number of corporations. Such images are spread EVERYWHERE. It is not up to the individual to choose keep her/his eyes closed or isolating her/him/their children from the real world around. It isn't an individual matter - choose to close your eyes; to turn off the TV, smartphone, computer; talk with children. Oh, come on, please. A man asked: "How in the world does this affect the state of our world today?" YOU are kidding us. Go study before talking nonsense.You need to understand that this is a SOCIAL issue. Society must, democratically, get control of production and distribution of images that become models of socially acceptable bodies. It is not ethically conceivable, if we're talking about CIVILIZATION degree, that some companies, in order to boost their profits more and more, monopolize and keep the power to dictate models of female bodies (just to remind: women's bodies are HUMAN BEINGS, PERSONS) increasingly dehumanized, causing health problems in large scale and even deaths.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I agree.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago It's gotta change, people.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Keep women real.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Any mandatory disclaimer should also state a percentage of the pic the disclaimer has to cover otherwise it would be so small that even the best sighted would need a magnifying glass to read it

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I object because airbrushed models are hotter than non-airbrushed models.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I absolutely agree with this idea - I vote, and I hope I have no more to see this kind of massacre

  • demian.teresa (Chile) 8 months ago This could change a lot of things. More than lies, more than advertising from the mass media it change people. Society and how we see things. We're not perfect and we'll never be.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think this is a positive move for both the advertiser and the public. Reasons for public is obvious, but perhaps a product will appeal more to the general population if the model in the ad is more like the general population. I, for one, am more likely to buy a product if I see myself using it. And a model that is more realistic will help the consumer make that connection.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago agreed.

  • GD000005858 (India) 8 months ago I totally support the move because I think women today spend far too much time obsessing about the 'imperfections' of their body. There are other, more pressing issues, that deserve our attention and energy. Gender equality maybe?

  • monicab (Netherlands) 8 months ago The question is why is being HOT an issue in the lives of many women. Looking good should be enough. And what about men .. most of these issues concern women. Men on covers are not Always that hot or attractive. Why can't we just accept the fact that allmost everyone has a body and a face that is good, perhaps not perfect. but who decides what is good and what is perfect.. a few people and we accept that for a fact.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This disclaimer should become mandatory. Women are people with thoughts and feelings, not objects to be designed and manipulated purely to give a few twisted humans pleasure while this artificial 'ideal' is forced upon and crushes the souls of countless others.

  • GD000005870 (Spain) 8 months ago I think this is a really good idea. I've been fighting against low self-esteem and other disorders for a long par of my life, and I'm still, so I would say that this is very useful for people like me and for the rest of the world.
    I'm not saying that models or airbrushing should be banned, or that my problems are because of them. It just would be great if society stopped having an "icon" for beauty and make us feel bad if we're not like that icon.
    It's not about "if you don't like it don't look at it" because this kind of adversiments or pictures are everywhere. And you don't even need a picture to feel bad, because everyone forces you to be "perfect" (even though that perfect includes unhealthy), and sometimes they do it accidentally, but it's the worst feeling ever.

    I would say that it's not about airbrushing, it's about society's mind.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is a brilliant idea, and will help us all to love real beauty & real people with real bodies - hopefully including our own :-)

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think this a great idea that could really help women and men in their perceptions of women. It can also help with our perceptions of men - men are airbrushed as well.

  • 000005894 (Denmark) 8 months ago I totally agree with the idea.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Why don't we change the models. Disclaimers are useless but if you put a real women/ man in magazines etv. you will achieve your results.

  • gewing (United States) 8 months ago hentschel, your comment is such a wonderful direct illustration of why our society needs to change the way it views women in general. You think they're hotter because you only ever have that option. Get with it bro

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think this idea is perfect to the society we live in today, where we require so much of ourselves by looking at models, that's because we are not aware of how much they airbrush models to look like we see them in magazines, so i'm in favour.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Who is really making the money off this here? The weight loss and food industries. If we can stop the feed then we can work towards fixing the problem.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago A disclaimer wouldn't hurt. It would give the artist credit and men and women a different perspective on what is real and what is not. Parenting is having accountability for your children. But making a change in society is having accountability in the world.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Agree

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Agree.

  • 000005928 (Canada) 8 months ago Not just in print media. All across the advertising landscape. Lets show the real, not the imagined.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Ban this, not just disclaim it!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Absolutely.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Stop the photoshop

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Stop the photoshop leave people as they are

  • Anonymous 8 months ago this has been sitting for too long, would love to see this move forward

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Definitely agreed - it's both false advertising and psychologically harmful. Even outside of recognisable 'advertisements', airbrushing on the covers of magazines and so on creates a false body image in the minds of female readers and a false expectation in the minds of male readers. Airbrushing should come with a disclaimer any time that it is used.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago That's thoughtful.
    Airbrushing can carry on, just put a disclamer so people know better. Not much harm done, airbrushing, is it? OR IS IT?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I don't think that they should stop with the disclaimers at air brushing. Their age should also be displayed, as most models for a lot of fashions are, as they say, "tweens". They are pictured in clothes meant for people much older than they are.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I don't watch magazines anymore because it makes me feel fat and ugly

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think having the disclaimer is a wonderful idea. Airbrushing is still useful in aesthetics and symmetry to draw the eye, but it should be done in a way that has a positive impact on young women instead of a negative impact (thus the disclaimer)

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Seems legit. In the video used to promote this idea, the woman is definitely about three times as sexy before she's edited. If this disclaimer idea works to the point that people stop editing women, we will see more sexy women, and be able to notice the sexy women around us more easily. The woman in reality is the kind of woman we would all like to celebrate. The woman in the final picture is a woman nobody knows. It is even possible that advertising without that level of editing would be more successful; I know I'd prefer to look at the woman as she is.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think it is a necessity to add disclaimers onto all airbrushed models. The world population of teenage girls severely suffer from a low self esteem. This is largely because of the comparisons they make with actresses or models. By adding a disclaimer to airbrushed women, these girls will be able to understand their true beauty. This would be a win-win situation for everyone because the girls would feel better about themselves and when guys start to date these girls, they will be able to have a women that knows her worth which is rewarding to the men.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago It isn't fair that normal looking girls have to feel like they aren't good enough. Maybe a disclaimer would remind them that the girls they're seeing ARENT REAL.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Creating unrealistic expectations of beauty through photoshop creates a false sense of worthlessness in our society. This disclaimer proposal is a great way to begin making a change for this issue.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Yes I totally agree. You have my vote.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I personally thought she looked more beautiful before airbrushing. I agree with "let's keep it real". It would only be honest to have a disclaimer, and we all appreciate honesty.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Airbrushing takes the image of an otherwise beautiful woman, and turns it into a freakish, distorted oddity. The advertising using this ugliness needs a disclaimer, to help people understand that NO human being can look like the image.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I am an upcoming runway/print model, and seeing the video they did for this honesty was a relief. I get so much make-up and airbrush tans thrown on me every time I have a job. I love it, it is apart of my job... but I cry seeing that video. I wish I had seen it earlier. I wish my cousins and sisters had seen it earlier. Before I could even get signed to my agency I went on a starvation diet to get to my size and look like those girls in the magazines, only to find out I am photoshopped and cropped anyway! I was never a big woman. I was a size 4 my whole life (20yrs old today). Personally, for me, seeing a disclaimer stating that these women have flaws and curves just like any other human would have made my transition into wanting to become a model much easier. I'm not saying this is going to change the world, but It could change one life. One girl could second guess going on that starvation diet to look like a guess model in Cosmopolitan Magazine. It is a step to show girls and women that we are all beautiful and we all have flaws; Even as a model.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago young impressionable girls & boys need to know that the standards they are exposed to in the media are false - that no one looks the way these airbrushed models do, and that human bodies are unique and special just the way God created them, not as Photoshop created them

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is a beautiful and genius plan. I couldn't agree more. There would be less eating disorders! Girls would have less stress put upon themselves to look like the fake ads to please men. Girls need to know the truth!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I agree, because while many of us may know that a model is airbrushed, we may not realize *just how much* the model is airbrushed. There's a difference between slimming someone down or making their skin "glow" and slimming them down, making the eyes bigger, lengthening the legs, etc
    Also, most of the objections are to stopping airbrush techniques. This is just sticking a disclaimer on it, like you'd see on a cd that has adult content. It doesn't change the content, it just lets you know it's there.

  • aregularjoe8 (United States) 8 months ago I've seen too many young women adopt destructive lifestyles (i.e. binge-and-purge eating, unnecessary plastic surgeries, etc.) in an attempt to obtain an unrealistic, and ultimately unattainable, "ideal" beauty. Meanwhile, they completely lose all semblance of a positive self-image.

  • sanchana.krishnan (India) 8 months ago I completely agree. Men with no sense of decency are only ones benefiting from such a practice and it gives impressionable young children a horrible message, and leaves the original models feeling like rubbish about themselves and their work as it is all illegitimate. STOP AIRBRUSHING!

  • ian.brett.520 (United Kingdom) 8 months ago I don't know why we havent done this sooner!!!!

  • GD000006028 (United States) 8 months ago I object because this idea addresses a symptom of the problem it seeks to solve, not the actual problem. Models are airbrushed as a *result* of society embracing / accepting unrealistic standards of beauty. Disclaimers on airbrushed models wouldn't likely impact the fact that these images would still be pleasing and therefore aspirational as a consequence of our existing tendency towards unrealistic standards of beauty. For instance, there are numerous cartoon and artistic depictions of women that adhere to these same standards, are obviously not real women, but still have the exact same effect of reinforcing these unrealistic expectations.

    This proposal does not effectively address the root cause of the problem it seeks to solve and would therefore not likely lead to meaningful or significant change.

  • 000006051 (United States) 8 months ago I support! All it requires is a disclaimer so people are aware about what they are seeing. If you protest against people lip syncing you should support this too as a photo shopped picture is deceiving and cheating especially when it is not representing person's true self.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I like this dea

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I agree that this should be a law

  • magiorey (Italy) 8 months ago My wife, who is slightly under her ideal weight thinks she's very overweight - why do you think?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago this helps people distinguish fantasy from reality.

  • tobias18 (Canada) 8 months ago I think the disclaimer would be a helpful way to help with the body images of not only young women, but women of all ages.

  • makena.griffin (United States) 8 months ago Waylonsweat- By that logic, the artists are finally getting recognition for their work. A censorship of airbrushing is not what is being suggested, only a way to raise awareness that what you might call "art" (I am not accepting or refuting your claim, only restating it) is being performed on the photos. A painter, for example, would not be censored by being required to say if he used oils versus acrylics.
    In addition, there is surprisingly little awareness about airbrushing. This lack of awareness is especially prevalent among some of the most impressionable people, children and youth. Therefore, a disclaimer of this kind would have to be easily understandable and obvious. Either way, an increase in education among the youth about such matters as airbrushing and the general corruption of the mass media will be completely vital in the fight for the re-enstatement of positive body image and free thought among all people.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago When truth is introduced everything that is based on a lie including any fear has no chance. -AJ Miller

  • Anonymous 8 months ago See the effect of the lack of commercials on Cuban women:
    http://www.uitzendinggemist.nl/afleveringen/1115739

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is a great idea

  • GD000006096 (Germany) 8 months ago Its not about socializing anybody or anything. This is not only about females or males. NOTHING in todays media is shown as it is. If its not a lie, its biased or manipulated to death. This idea doesn't go far enough. And by the way - having to add a disclaimer is not censorship. Using makeup and photoshop even on the most beautiful person on earth is.

  • mhsn (Malaysia) 8 months ago As a man I enjoyed watching these bodies, but through time I have felt how it destroys my feelings for real girls and makes some stupid expectations

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think that being aware of a model having been airbrushed is just the first step. When you look at an airbrushed model women subconsciously compare themselves. Even if people are aware it still has an impact on self image and self-esteem. Ideally I would like to see the practice outlawed all together.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago The disclaimer on airbrushed models should absolutely be mandatory.

  • 000006119 (New Zealand) 8 months ago I vote for this because we need the transparency in order to prevent the potential internal destruction that we are causing to future generations. It is not hard to implement, and if companies really think their models are perfect enough to advertise their product, they should be comfortable with showing the model exactly as they are rather than with the help of airbrushing. If not, why not feature a disclaimer to state otherwise?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Great idea. A hard battle but worth the fight.

  • helpmebadgerlala (United Kingdom) 8 months ago Most people know models are airbrushed, myself included (although I had no idea how much manipulation was involved). However, many people still don't, and I can imagine the inadequacy one must feel when seeing one of these photos of a "real" person!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Definitely should make this happen

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Yes.

  • GraceAbounds (United States) 8 months ago Our standard of beauty is our spouse, not airbrushed models. The Lord made Eve, only one woman, and presented her to Adam as his friend, lover, and wife. What he did not do was create millions of women and say "choose." She was his standard and the same should go for every man and every woman yesterday, today and tomorrow. If you are single, consider preparing for your spouse so when the Lord brings them into your life you are pure and ready for them. Be prepared to love them and have only them be your standard of beauty. If you claim to have a "type," you need to get rid of that mindset because you have bought into the worldly mindset of "the perfect girl/guy."

  • kdl0vesu (Canada) 8 months ago Genius idea. So many young women (AND MEN!) think they need to meet society's expectations, not knowing that they will never meet these expectations because it is impossible without photoshop altering! Young people idolize these false images of "beauty" to the point that they lose their own self-esteem and begin to hate themselves. This is NO way for a young individual to be brought up, especially since we're lucky enough to live in a country that gives us all the necessities we need. The one problem we're faced with is our psychological health and being brainwashed by the media and "models" (frauds) is what's causing the most damage. WE DEMAND THE TRUTH! I definitely agree that mandatory disclaimers should be put on every magazine cover, music video, television ad, etc. that manipulates the bodies of women and/or men. Save the future youth, protect them from the false icons society feeds them.
    EVERYONE SHOULD LOVE THEMSELF FOR WHOM THEY ARE. PERFECTION LIES BENEATH THE SKIN, NOT IN PHOTOGRAPHS!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago A great step in the right direction - that direction being the one that leads to a world where natural beauty has been reclaimed.

  • 000006150 (Canada) 8 months ago This is a great step in the right direction - that direction being the one that leads to a world where natural beauty has been reclaimed.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I support, i'm tired of all the fake crap.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago disclaimer sounds like accurate reporting. otherwise people think what they see is reality

  • Anonymous 8 months ago It's about TIME! I don't think that people realize just how manipulated images can get. Having a disclaimer there clears some of the smoke and mirrors in a way, mentally.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago airbrushed ads cause body dysmorphia and self hatred among too many women.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Agreed

  • keenkiwi (New Zealand) 8 months ago lets do this NOW!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is a beautiful idea. I'm behind it 100%

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is a brilliant idea and one step on the way to self-acceptance and happiness for more people - especially young people.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago i agree. they are far too many girls aspiring to an unattainable idea of beauty and defeating their self esteem and confidence by buying into the whole idea. this would be great in proving how unrealistic most of these models are, as many of them are normal everyday girls with great make-up, great lighting and even better photographers. it isn't right for girls to feel inadequate against women like this when they are in fact not so different than these women who are paraded on the tv, magazines etc.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Because we lie enough to each other.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is a great idea. Teenage girls especially look through magazines to copy hairstyles and makeup tips and outfits and end up trying to copy the unnatural bodies of these airbrushed models thinking, "Well, if they can be a size zero, then so can I." Realistically, that's not healthy or advised, but as a 17-year-old anorexic, I can tell you that that is a very realistic thought. At 5'8", I'm 130 pounds (and hopefully lowering), but I honestly consider myself to be overweight. To me, being slightly underweight is preferred because that's part of how I grew up. The people I idolized were always airbrushed when I saw them. I wanted to be just like them, including how small they were. And growing up where almost nothing I see is real makes it even harder. I love those Dove commercials where models of all sizes are publicized. Even if they are airbrushed, it's a step in the right direction. People need to idolize confidence and being healthy, not just looking like the pretend model. I want the body of a model because maybe if I do, I can like myself just a little bit more. And that's just so wrong and needs to change. But being faced with the endless pictures does nothing but create longing for something that doesn't exist. People need to get that. These images do not exist. These people do not exist. Their bodies are not real. It is all fake and created on a computer by someone who will never look like that picture. The model in the picture doesn't even look like that. Everyone needs to understand that.

  • LunaticZombie (India) 8 months ago Not only there should be disclaimer, It should be big enough to go into the brain of consumer. few people are saying that mostly people know, and doesn't make a difference to restate it. But when a kid sees it, it all goes into his subconscious, in his very core he grows with unreal expectations.
    Moreover, these kind of fake adverts move the focus to external appearance, instead of internal beauty, which is actually more important and long lasting.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Its a negative image, get rid of them

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Let's do this

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This needs to be done. Thank you for making a change. I'm behind you all the way!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago People feel like shit about their bodies because we constantly are surrounded by false images of what a "beautiful" body looks like. It doesn't have to be that way. That is why this is important!

  • dragonfreak365 (United States) 8 months ago I believe that there should be a disclaimer not only on commercials, but also magazines. I, among many other girls in the United States, can say that seeing these women makes one feel bad about one's self. Even though us girls know that the pictures may or may not be fake, they still hurt us because our bodies cannot compare. A big problem with this is when many young girls, still even in middle school, take their own lives because they don't think they're pretty, or that no boy could ever love her. I know this from personal experiences with friends. I hope that, someday, all girls will understand that they're beautiful, no matter their comparison with models on tv or in magazines. I feel as if this goal will be easier and quicker to achieve with this one step, maybe not the biggest step, but it's definitely a positive one . And, before I end my comment, I've seen other people saying basically the same thing as this: The disclaimer should be visible! Not tiny font on the bottom of the screen or page that no one ever pays attention to.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Airbrushing is a scam and a con. It results in suppressing women's self-confidence, and that in turn means they are always a little bit more hesitant and find it a little bit more difficult to contribute their full participation in the world of ideas and solutions.

  • SophiaP (United States) 8 months ago It's a form of brainwashing - we think people (should) look like that and it's not even physically possible. The whole industry is playing us to profit from our insecurity and vanity. They shouldn't be allowed to lie to us.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago C'est trop triste pour les jeunes filles qui ne s'aiment pas, qui se trouvent trop grosses, qui se trouve laides; c'est triste de voir ces jeunes filles rendues de jeunes femmes à l' âge adulte qui ne s'aimeront toujours pas, qui continueront à avoir des comportements alimentaires dysfonctionnels, à se rendre malade pour maigrir le plus possible et de mettre leur santé en danger, de voir des jeunes femmes de 21 ans qui vont déjà chez un plasticien pour se refaire les seins; mais jusqu'où les sataniques revues de mode et de beauté sont prêtes à aller pour faire leur argent sur le dos de ces pauvres victimes; victimes de cette énormité surnaturel; victimes de leurs innocences que vous aimez tant manipuler; mais sans aucun scrupule le monde de la mode se croit et veut faire croire au monde entier que vous avez le monopole de la science esthétique et beauté; alors que vous n'êtes que des marchands de faussetés.

    La beauté d'une personne, la VRAIE beauté, est lorsque cette personne réussit les buts qu'elle s'est fixés dans sa vie, ou qu'elle échoue mais a appris de ses erreurs, une personne qui a confiance en elle et ne se laisse pas intimidé par quoi que soit, une personne qui a de belles qualités du cœur, une personne qui donne au suivant, et je peux continuer longtemps; des personnes comme celle-là sont les plus belles au monde; nous sommes rendu en 2014 et encore nous en sommes là, avec tous ces clichés de l'image de beauté; à quand l'époque où vous allez comprendre qu'elle est la véritable beauté que vous devez transmettre dans vos magazines, dans vos parades de mode, dans vos pubs; à quand allez-vous véhiculer la réalité dans toute sa splendeur et sa beauté propre???

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Let's get this going - how about a Change.org petition. The info re this website was rather hard to get to - at the end of a video on Upworthy that kept crashing. Glad I persisted. This should HAPPEN!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago this needs to happen, is there a change.org petition already?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago It's simply a lie. I think that most of young people (girls AND boys) have a wrong feeling abput their body.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Why not force an acknowledgment of the 'artist' that airbrushed the picture - makes it clear its airbrushed and also advertises the artists talent.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago either way, we need to stop women from being objectified in the Marketing & Fashion industry. Women are much more worth than that.

  • 000006247 (Canada) 8 months ago We need to know the truth.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Because I pray our daughters may learn to love their bodies for what they allow them to do rather than hate them for not looking like products of computer programming,

  • henriksson.jan (Sweden) 8 months ago very easy decision and important. how can we make it happen for real?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I agree with this. This is mainly being done for the younger audience, kids in elementary to high school who might not know about advertisement and how images are manipulated to look "perfect".

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Let's do it. Now.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I support because airbrushing destroys the model's confidence and the consumer's. Women and men deserve better than manipulated perfection.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I get media use of 'attractive' bodies, I understand the marketing...but there are real bodies real women real men that are attractive without all the touch ups. I work at a school wig young girls (8-10) who already have self esteem issues and body image issues (they're not even fully developed!) imagine what the next generations are goi to be struggling with!?

  • ashley.k.keer (United Kingdom) 8 months ago This is a great idea!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago great idea!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Wonderful idea! No reason to get rid of the overly perfect picture of a person. Just inform us that it isn't real... hentschel get's the "hotter" model, and everyone get's the truth about the image. Win-Win

  • Anonymous 8 months ago On peut sauver des gens

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Pour la santé mentale de toutes les femmes, eunes et vieillies, belles ou pas, je suis fortement pour l'imposition de ce ``disclaimer``.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Real is beautiful.

  • candycj99 (United States) 8 months ago Young people need realistic models, and not what we see today. Young girls don't know what being healthy is anymore. They think it means being skinny to look good in an outfit. Being fit, and healthy should be promoted but honestly.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This idea will definitely improve the self esteem of men and women alike. I'm all for it.

  • Lilac (United States) 8 months ago This a brave and bold step. Ads should sell a product and they can do many things to get people to buy but they should not be allowed to LIE and present beauty and body's that are not real. As someone who is familiar with the graphic design world and advertising I believe this is the ugly side of it.

  • Lilac (United States) 8 months ago Brave and bold start. I hope its only the beginning!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago therein lies the issues. this must stop.

  • GD000006294 (Canada) 8 months ago This type of deception must stop.

  • 000006297 (United States) 8 months ago i was clued in to this phenomenon by an episode of season 17 of south park
    i'm not ashamed that i've been evangelized by a satirical comedy and a Facebook post

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I support this idea.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I support this idea.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago There is nothing wrong with enhancing something to be more pleasing to people. However all the enhancement MUST be mentioned.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I'm for it. More transparency, more truth

  • AmieLarocque (Canada) 8 months ago If this never happens let's teach our children to see the disclaimer in their minds.

  • athorenfeldt (Denmark) 8 months ago Beauty is the mind who sees not what the majority because there might 1000 people who likes all the same things 100% then there is another 1000 who have maybe 20 % difference to the first 1000 ETC ETC.

  • aprildawngetz (United States) 8 months ago falseness is never real beauty.

  • GD000006356 (Faroe Islands) 8 months ago I could not agree more! Manipulated, idealised images of women only cause problems: women who automatically compare themselves to them (including the model herself), men who think that this is how a real woman looks like (ignoring the fact that it's fake), and lastly, the producers and magazine owners/publishers who make money out of these "objects"!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago please do this, tired of the photoshoped lies!! It hurts our sons and daughters!!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Absolutely!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think that airbrushing leads to a false ideal for people. WHy can't we be happy with the way we are?? Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. All forms of media need to realize that being honest and portraying natural beauty will always when in the end.

  • 000006379 (United States) 8 months ago good idea

  • Anonymous 8 months ago love this idea.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago A great idea. The airbrushed images brainwash people int having unrealistic expectations as to how someone should look. This is not the same as a nice hairdo and makeup, it is fantasy. On British TV, think of the difference between Gok Wan and "10 years younger."

  • Anonymous 8 months ago airbushing should be disclosed just as mascara ads let you know that the model is styled with lash inserts. its only fair that when something shown is not realistic it is made clear and not presented as truth

  • Anonymous 8 months ago A step in the right direction

  • JMCM12389 (United States) 8 months ago I object because I think there are underlying issues with relation to perception that need to be addressed more precisely than just putting a piece of text next to a picture that says "pretty please feel good about yourself". Advertising has been doing the same thing for years, it's just gotten more sophisticated, which means that the people who wish to fight the trend need to utilize sophisticated ideas as well. This is a generally good idea, but in practice in would not pan out properly.

  • GD000006409 (United States) 8 months ago This should be a mandatory off all advertisements that enhance or manipulate images of women and men. Thank you for submitting this wonderful idea.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is an excellent idea, Im male, I fully approve

  • sapphirescimitar (United States) 8 months ago A disclaimer would be good because it's nice to know what is real and what is not.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago YES PLEASE!!!

  • 000006424 (United Kingdom) 8 months ago YES!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago hey hentschel I bet you are so ugly that you project it onto what women should look like and maybe secretly you wish you could be airbrushed in real life. Let's vote on this one folks so less airheads like this have a say

  • Anonymous 8 months ago YES!

  • arun.nemali (United States) 8 months ago Get on with it.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Yes

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think it is important for young woman to understand that what they may see as "beauty" is manipulated beauty and can't base their life, their appearances on what they see in commercials or on television. Many Hollywood actresses are outraged when they see their "cover shot" of a magazine and learn that their image was altered digitally. It's only important that women of ALL ages (and even men!) KNOW that what they are seeing is FAKE. That way individuals can make their own INFORMED decisions.

  • GD000006477 (United States) 8 months ago When models or products are airbrushed without disclosure it is ultimately deceitful. It creates unhealthy false idealization for both men and women. We have a standard of truth for revealing what is synthetic in other circumstances (food, vitamins, fabric, the oil in your car); this should be no different. Airbrushing male and female models continues to have tremendous impacts on our society. We objectify and idealize individuals without question, and therefore treat ourselves and others this way. We need to view each other as people, not objects or products. A disclaimer for airbrushed models would be a small step in the right direction.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I object, because airbrushed models are NOT REAL.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I'm proud of what I look.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I'm all for it! I am a 26 year old women with a child. I always been considerd pretty but after having a child my body will never look the same and these photos only make me ashamed of myself. I think it should be mandatory!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I would love to see this to happen!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think we need to stop photoshopping beauty. Airbrushed models are the ones giving 12 or even 13 yr. olds eating disorders; they want to be beautiful, not have natural beauty.

  • 000006495 (United States) 8 months ago I think this is a great idea. Cause even though you can do your best to teach your teenage daughter/boy to love the way she/he naturally looks, teenagers have a habit of not always listening to adults, it might make it easier for them to really realize how unrealistic is it if they always see that disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Great idea.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Agree wholeheartedly - and the sooner the better.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This should be common sense to all people.

  • 000006504 (New Zealand) 8 months ago I agree with the idea

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Dont make us zombie!

  • 000006510 (United States) 8 months ago I think its wrong as it causes young girls looking through a fashion mag or like lets say teen people etc see these images and idolize them to be true they dont know its fake and photoshopped so it can effect their self esteem and cause them to not value them selfs.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I like the idea of mandatory disclaimers when airbrushing models. Creating the an "ideal" image for the human body has been part of art for quite a long time (ancient greek sculptures, renaissance paintings, etc.) and digital tools like photoshop are just another way of doing this. However, I am painfully aware of the negative impact these images have as well. A mandatory disclaimer might help people to realize that these airbrushed body-ideals are unrealistic.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I vote for the idea. It's true that most people realize that what they see in these pictures is not real, but first of all, most people is not all the people. Seeing airbrushed models can make young girls have unrealistic expectations from their own body and that's really bad. Accepting yourself is an important thing. Contrary to what some people may say, putting a mandatory disclaimer is not censoring the work of the artist, who worked on improving the picture, rather it's an acknowledgement of their work.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago To GD000001469: It's not the parents' fault that women see their bodies as less than perfect. It's our society's fault and our culture. If a parent shows their young, high school age girl videos showing airbrushing of models, tells their child they're beautiful, and encourages them in every way possible, it is still not enough. It's the way that MEN see WOMEN [in every sense of the word "see"]. It's our marriage views, cultural norms, and..you DO know that women still get paid less in the work place, right? This viewpoint of women being seen as sexual objects cannot simply DISAPPEAR with some solid, home encouragement. Peer pressure and societal truth (this is the way people actually see women, consciously or unconsciously) is enough to nullify any encouragement at home. We need to take a stand together. I think it needs to be with our money, because this is what our society [sadly] values. By avoiding brands that use this type of advertising (you'd be surprised, not all fashion brands/clothing companies take the approach of using size 000 models), you'll say what you have to say, and someone will hear you. At the very least, they will see that their ad campaign isn't working, and they'll try something new.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago As a woman with body image issues I cannot help but wonder why this is even an issue.......why isn't natural beauty, flaws and all, accepted as beautiful? Why can we not be taught and teach our daughters just to love themselves.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Agree, I don't want my child to hurt her self because she feels so bad, that she doesn't look as good as the models in the magazines.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Why does a model, the ideal picture for how a woman should look, need to be airbrushed? Instead, why not eliminate airbrushing completely?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think this is a great idea. It's just a reminder and an aid to bring awareness to the practice. I have an 8 year old daughter who is already starting to compare herself to what she sees in the media. I do monitor what she sees and watches but short of moving to a recluse-type of community with no outside influence it's hard to filter the barrage of messages that girls get. And my daughter is so amazing and perfect...as are all young girls. It's heartbreaking to see. So yeah, I'm all for it!

  • DaniiSR (Mexico) 8 months ago This is a great idea, some people can't see the real problem, women try to get that impossible perfect body and they feel bad all the time, the advertising just want to sale more magazines, man catalog women (not all of it) , they only want to see perfect bodies, but they can't see reallity, and the reallity is: women bodies are perfect just like they are. Let's help people see the truth.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Yes please!

  • dennychill (United States) 8 months ago People know on some level that the models are airbrushed, but it doesn't stop them from comparing themselves to the magazine photo. This eventually creates low self-esteem, which leads to many other problems. A disclaimer on the ad is a great idea. I think it will remind people, on a conscious level, that the person in the ad does not actually look like that. I know that when I see candid photos of celebrities without make-up, they look much more normal. They look like I do. They're still beautiful, but real. It's refreshing to see that and reminds me that I'm not actually ugly, like I often think I am. Young girls and even boys growing up with disclaimers on the ads they see may have a fighting chance at good self-esteem. The rest of us weren't so lucky growing up and often have to go to therapy for damage control. Lets make this great idea a reality.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Truth is key in life. Digitally manipulating photos of any kind to a significant extent, especially those of human beings, and publishing or presenting them as actual real-life images is, and needs to be, fully and publicly considered fraud. Knowing that any given image seen in the media began as a photograph, but became a "digital art project," which was then published as a photo, is a vital step toward giving both individuals and the general public as a whole a healthier, and more truthful visual understanding of both themselves and the human form, that is based on truth and reality, rather than the subtle but convincing artistic capabilities of a person behind a computer screen. With the lines between photography, film, and audio recordings blurring and blending with those of animation, special effects, and digital enhancement technologies to an ever-increasing extent, the need to be made aware of exactly what you're looking at or hearing is rapidly becoming more and more urgent everyday, and the lack of such knowledge thus far is absolutely causing serious and lasting changes in the way people view themselves, each other, and humanity, with alarmingly negative and exacerbating results. Michelangelo painted the human form in all the glory of it's idealized "perfection," but never claimed or implied that those images were factual representations of the real people he saw around him in the time and place in which he lived, increasing the artistic skill level acknowledged in his work, along with his imagination and creative vision as an artist. The same approach and understanding needs to be re-adopted today, for everyone's sake. Tell it like it is.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago yup, false advertising, manipulating perception, at least have the dignity to tell us.

  • (United States) 8 months ago I agree with disclaimers.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I object because this will not stop the problem. The problem is that we consumers buy more product when we see them advertised with an airbrushed body vs a non-airbrushed body.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago This is going down a slippery slope to regulation of all advertising or any artwork for that matter. What we need is promotion of selfesteime for one another and not putting on the blame game that could lead to the destruction of someone's job and talent.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Pure Genius!

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Pure Genius!

  • kogalicious (United States) 8 months ago There is no reason why this should not be implemented. Someone mentioned that they believe it is censoring an artist, but I personally see it as giving the artist more credit, if you want to consider airbrushing a model art (I'm not saying it is or is not). So many young people (and older people alike) feel like they need to look like these painted-up models when it is, in fact, impossible.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think it should actually be illegal to change a person's image electronically.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago Definitely agree. Girls are getting the wrong idea of what's healthy and natural. This affects me personally, as well as many other girls/guys I know. The majority of female aren't 100 lbs and guys aren't typically broad shouldered and overly muscular, with chiseled features. These photoshopped images are causing so many people to hate their bodies and envy those of the unrealistic models on magazine covers. This is a small step toward healthy minds and bodies.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think a disclaimer should definitely be mandatory. Magazines and advertisers need to start taking responsibility on the gross negative impact they are having on many women's self-esteem, body image and diet.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I agree there must be a disclaimer

  • Anonymous 8 months ago gimmicky

  • sydtuck (United States) 8 months ago Yes, we can choose to know models are airbrushed- or we can choose to stay away from these images (to an extent)- but it doesn't change the fact that many others do not know how false the images are or are not trying to stay away. Tons of girls grow up with eating disorders or emotional problems due to unhappiness with their bodies. The images the media shows are causing us to chase vain things like body images; it's creating an obsession for our country that's empty and unhealthy. I hope the images eventually change to show different body images, but for now, a disclaimer is a great step. It's a good reminder to everyone who sees an image that it is not real, and it is not something that should be strived for-- since it's unattainable. Maybe companies would use pictures of normal people to avoid the disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I support this 100%!

  • 000006605 (United Kingdom) 8 months ago Some might say that it's obvious if a model is airbrushed so a disclaimer isn't necessary. But think about an eleven year old girl reading an issue of 'Bliss' (UK) or 'Seventeen' and seeing those models. Girls deserve to feel confident and comfortable with how they look, and it can drive them crazy, because they don't know it's fake. They should be able to read the latest gossip and get advice without feeling ashamed about their bodies.

  • 000006605 (United Kingdom) 8 months ago Also, how are we supposed to get guys to find us attractive if they see all the airbrushed girls? They might start thinking that we're supposed to look like that. Though that would make them pretty stupid.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I don't have anything against snake oil salesmen, as long as they call it snake oil...not medicine. Truth in advertisement...otherwise it should be considered fraud.

  • GD000006639 (South Africa) 8 months ago I think this is brilliant, as it is probably nigh on impossible to stop, but knowing is half the battle won. And for those who say airbrushed is better (yes, I'm looking at you), knowing that it is airbrushed shouldn't disturb your fumblings.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago If no one on earth actually looks like the airbrushed models, then why give people the idea that people like that exist? It's a level that no one can reach, but everyone is striving for. It's harmful to society's standards of beauty because we're drawn to beauty that doesn't exist. A simple disclaimer is not unreasonable by any means. And for the people against it, it changes nothing but a line of text under the picture. Great idea.

  • sighentist (Poland) 8 months ago Definitely.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I object because this practice damages the self esteem and self worth of real people who are subjected to these false ideals.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I agree. Why should we see modified models if no one is really like that?

  • Anonymous 8 months ago i agree with the idea because of the eating disorders it has created in people.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think that this is a very simple and easy thing to change that will do a lot of good.

  • rosalita2 (United States) 8 months ago It is critical people understand that those in pictures do not exist.

  • Anonymous 8 months ago I think a mandatory disclaimer should be made permanent for every manipulated body made public.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago To take this excellent idea a logical step further, I propose mandatory disclaimers on *all* fiction, from television series to music albums. For instance, when a character uses a so-called superpower in a superhero film, a caption at the bottom of the screen ought to indicate to young boys and more that the power is impossible, peppered with citations from scientific journals. Special effects as a practice should be discouraged when they transform otherwise permanent abilities on humans, but in the odd film in which they do appear, it should be made very clear that they are factitious rather than factual. Emphasizing their falsehood is a very simple step in the right direction to addressing the harm that we're causing in making young boys and more believe that superpowers are possible. This leads them to become dissatisfied with their quotidian lives.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I can't live up to what I see

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I strongly agree with this!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I agree!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I support this.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Yes

  • YoureTotallyCreepin (United States) 7 months ago I agree because this could be the first step to correcting the image young women take of themselves. No woman is perfect, but seeing perfection as the worldwide accepted image does not ease the lack of self-image woman already have. This won't stop agencies from airbrushing their models, these models HAVE TO BE larger than life. This is what creates ambition, and envy. To vital things for structure in today's society. However, it would be fine-printed reminder that no woman NEEDS to look like this to be beautiful. Additionally, they should hold steady to a new, interesting law. A weight minimum to be on a catwalk, or magazine cover. A healthy weight minimum. I completely agree with this proposal!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago The emotional health of girls and women is infinitely more important.

    SCD -- Houston

  • Anonymous 7 months ago We need to love and accept each other, and ourselves, for the beautiful creatures we are.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago As women we should all support and encourage each others real beauty. Real beauty all the way!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Support, women see many of these models who are edited beyond belief to make a "perfect" figure, in response, women starve themselves, hate themselves and much more just to try and replicate an image which does not clearly state is fake.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Great idea. This is a vote for reality.

  • ChiTownBears (United States) 7 months ago I like the idea, mainly because it is a step in the right direction. This idea is not meant to be the final resolution. Ultimately, feeling good about one's self comes down to the individual, but a teen seeing all of these pictures of gorgeous women, aka lies, does not help. For the most part teens have not yet come to the realization that there is more to life than high school drama. For teen girls to see the disclaimer and realize the girl in that photo is not perfect either helps put their own lives into perspective

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Amazing idea

  • Anonymous 7 months ago hentschel go fuck a realdoll.com

  • GD000006788 (United States) 7 months ago I think we should all grow up with the idea that our bodies of every shape, size, color and every single detail is who we are and nothing to be ashamed of. We all grow up thinking that there are things wrong with us because of these images of "perfection". There's no such thing as perfection, humans shouldn't strive for perfection. We should all strive to be the best person we can be and accept the idea that our outer appearances are just shells holding our more true and pure forms.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago totally agree

  • Anonymous 7 months ago totally agree

  • 000006821 (Spain) 7 months ago I totally agree with the proposal.
    But isn't "airbrushed" too specific, and may allow many other computer manipulations? I thought airbrush only affected the colour and homogeneity of skin. I know it's used as "improve" too, but I thought only in some kind of metaphorical or non-physical sense.

  • heavensangelle (United States) 7 months ago We are teaching women and young women that they will never be "good enough." Our society sickens me. Even the models aren't "good enough" on their own.

  • cationthecalicat (United States) 7 months ago There is an unachievable standard of beauty imposed upon women, which is damaging for not only women, but for men as well. The media incessantly bombards society with images and pictures featuring unattainable beauty. Advertisements constantly seem to make promises of "fixing" girls so long as they buy a certain products, even though we all know that no girl will naturally have airbrushed-looking skin, regardless of what creams or lotions she applies to her skin.

    In addition to hurting women, men are also the targets of these types of images. Advertisements with male models often depict the same kind of fake, airbrushed, edited looks. Furthermore, these advertisements create unrealistic expectations of not only ourselves, but of other people. When people get an unrealistic image of what a potential significant other should look like, they are left searching in vain. Flaws are intrinsic to our appearances, but instead of accepting them and moving on, images featuring photoshopped people force us to believe they those flaws shouldn't be where they are, or that flaws are things to dread.

    Ultimately, the images that promote unattainable beauty hurt not only women, but men as well, hurting society as a whole. Thus, I feel it is in the best interest of everyone to take action and support this idea.

  • GD000006848 (United States) 7 months ago it's a start but not a solution. i don't believe bodies were meant to be exploited and the message that airbrushing gives women, in particular is negative in so many ways - from health to self-image

  • mckalejude (United States) 7 months ago From personal experience, I can state that seeing in print that these models have been photoshopped would have helped me to not be so hard on myself. The fact that this idea of the "perfect woman" as reinforced by magazines, the fashion industry, and the media is what some people conceive as "normal" or "right" has destroyed the self esteem and health of millions of women (and men!), including myself. I feel that disclaimers would certainly have saved me from a load of suffering and self-loathing.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago We should all know the truth. No one deserves to be shamed because of their shape or size or weight. This really is dreadful and disgusting, a complete atrocity!

  • fer44 (Spain) 7 months ago I object because i think, all the images are manipulated.

  • 000006888 (United States) 7 months ago There are disclaimers when food is photographed and the texture has been enhanced- certainly there is no reason a disclaimer can't be used with people as well. If only from the standpoint that the garment being sold will not create the illusion of limbs quite that long or the face cream will not create skin the pore-less. Or it can be approached as a public health issue like cigarettes- they need a warning. How about "this model's body has been enhanced/changed by a computer and does not represent an actual human body. Dieting or exercising to achieve this figure may result in poor health or death."

  • LucaFranco (Brazil) 7 months ago I don't think people understand the text. it not censor on the airbrushing, it's just a disclaimer.

  • GD000006898 (United States) 7 months ago I absolutely love this idea.

  • AndiMandy (Canada) 7 months ago Absolutely for this 200% !! Saw the/a video for this and it broke my heart!! What was wrong with her before ?? Dont like the way they look then go somewhere else!! I definitely think this needs to happen! <3

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I agree with this idea because it is so unrealistic for women to be putting so much effort, so much thought, and so much money, into trying to achieve the physical appearance of an unrealistic "model." Even their name subconsciously implants that we should be trying to emulate them. Is this what we want to teach our young girls? That they have to be absolutely flawless? I know that this logic is just ridiculous, and still I find myself as affected as everyone else– buying the products... doing the treatments... even feeling guilty after indulging. It is ridiculous, but I still don't quite know how to kick it.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago girls become hypersexualized by media and this causes them great harm. i support the mandatory labeling. but how is it enforceable?

  • KimShree (United States) 7 months ago Please place disclaimers that are in normal size font for everyone to see and recognize!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago No one is perfect ... why does the media think we want to see it? I prefer to see "normal" people i can relate to, not Barbies....

  • Anonymous 7 months ago totally for it

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Not only is this a bad idea for young women's self image, but it is simply misleading advertising. I always thought this was already regulated.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago this would solve so many problems that teens are having, so many things could change because of making models REAL people

  • Anonymous 7 months ago this would solve so many problems that people have with themselves, so many people could be saved because they didn't think they were too fat to live, and then kill themselves, models SHOULD be REAL people, not tiny little toothpicks that are still photoshopped to make them look even thinner

  • Anonymous 7 months ago yes

  • Anonymous 7 months ago let's do this!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago this should be on all magazines

  • Anonymous 7 months ago this is such a great idea

  • Anonymous 7 months ago absolutely .. it's time everyone came out of the coccoon of glossy magazines and saw the real world
    apart from the self image conflicts created for young people (male models get airbrushed too & anorexia is an illness that affects males as well as females)
    but as well I feel empathy for the models being portrayed in glossy magazines in an airbrushed body that isn't theirs and then being ridiculed for all their flaws when seen in public

  • pete.furlong.5 (United States) 7 months ago You cannot tell what has been airbrushed/photoshopped and what has not. We all carry the burden of these messages of beauty definitions. Let's help free the next generation from this same burden whenever we can.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I work with teen girls that carve/cut names into themselves if they don't look like Barbie. Girls need to get more realistic about real beauty, and warnings would at least create information that isn't out there now.

  • AFamilyMan (United States) 7 months ago I agree that adding a disclaimer that is easy to view and read would benefit both the self-esteem of the targeted population, and the targeted consumer in general. Airbrushing images not only furthers unrealistic standards and falsifies results, but applies pressure to purchase on those that seek to conform to the aforementioned standard, adding stress and inevitable disappointment to an already tense and disillusioned people. The change would be minor, the art form would still exist (though, admittedly it would become less marketable), and the consumer would have a statement that will help them better cope with the differences found between themselves and the body images they are bombarded with on a daily basis. In short, necessary step in the right direction.

    A population that is dissatisfied with itself is easier to sell to, as it lacks the confidence resist marketing and societal pressure.

    Honestly, I would like to see this and other false advertising done away with altogether, as I'm tired of being lied to. But let's face it, lies are necessary for sales when a product can neither hold up to honest scrutiny, nor merit a sale based on what it provides.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago it's cruel to create standards that are not possible and destroys what we know of as true beauty and the human figure

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I totally approve of this idea

  • Anonymous 7 months ago We should all just assume that ALL images have been "retouched", and are NOT REAL...

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Even though we know air brushed models are not real that doesn't scratch the fact that they make us feel poorly about ourselves. Sure you might say that you can just turn off the television or put away the magazine but it is not possible to avoid these fake images that society shows women as. I hear beautiful women say how they wish they looked like the models they see in their magazines and it saddens me. The images stretched out and airbrushed might, in some peoples minds, look hotter, sexier, and/or more beautiful, but they are fake. These images are teaching young women and even children they aren't as beautiful as they should be when, in fact, it is not possible to reach this level of 'perfection'. Using unenhanced photos of women all shapes and sizes would help teach young women that they should be happy with themselves.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Just like a box of cornflakes has "Not Actual Size" on it, we should have the same disclaimers on models. This is a simple matter of TRUTH IN ADVERTISING. Old idea; new presentation.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Companies should be shamed into not using airbrushing and photo-shopping at all. Let's have ONLY real people, with their real proportions etc., shown to us as "models".

  • NAOMiiZ.MOMMY (United States) 7 months ago This is one of the greatest ideas I've heard in a long time.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago How about we all love our bodies regardless? Love the idea - but we can rely on outside factors to make us feel better about ourselves. We will be waiting forever. All about choice.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Why not ban it altogether?

  • Anonymous 7 months ago It's a big deal when we , men & women, are behind upheld to standards that are unreachable, unhealthy, and unreal. Even when the general populations know they are fake it doesn't take away from the fact that these airbrushers are creating an "ideal" person we should look like. Not to mention that children aren't aware they're fake. And even if 100% of the population is aware of these fallacies, does that make people more content with their bodies when they're considered too fat, too thin, too tan, too pale, too busty, too small breasted, too tall, too short, hair too frizzy, etc. knowing they're fake doesn't take away the feeling of inadequacy that even models themselves feel.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago It's a big deal when we , men & women, are behind upheld to standards that are unreachable, unhealthy, and unreal. Even when the general populations know they are fake it doesn't take away from the fact that these airbrushers are creating an "ideal" person we should look like. Not to mention that children aren't aware they're fake. And even if 100% of the population is aware of these fallacies, does that make people more content with their bodies when they're considered too fat, too thin, too tan, too pale, too busty, too small breasted, too tall, too short, hair too frizzy, etc. knowing they're fake doesn't take away the feeling of inadequacy that even models themselves feel.

  • 000007116 (Mexico) 7 months ago ok

  • catherine.kuehl.3 (United States) 7 months ago An excellent idea. It's not just young people affected by this airbrushing silliness, older people wonder why they don't look as "young" as people on magazines. Women in the news who aren't models get the airbrushing treatment, too. We're all human beings and valuable as is. Some arbitrary standard only works to sell product.

  • theslavesdream (United Kingdom) 7 months ago I'm not saying airbrushing should stop - just that we should know when it has happened - so that our daughters don't all feel alienated in our own bodies because they think that the "improved" body is the "normal" body.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I agree!

  • melissah.etienne (United States) 7 months ago hentschel. They are hotter by society's standard of beauty, which you obviously adhere to. But that is not the point of this at all. The point is for girls to stop killing themselves in order to achieve a kind of beauty that will never be achieved, because what they see in magazines and media websites are not even people. They're images constructed by the companies using a human as a basis for basic structures.

  • 000007135 (Turkey) 7 months ago I am a plastic surgeon. I support this idea because the peoples body image has impaired by mass media at the present day. In my clinical practice I am awared of the expectations of people becoming more unrealistic day by day. I don't want to make clone beauties. I prefer explore and improve the people s own beauty, its sense more ethical and convenient for the human nature

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I think this is an awesome idea. This is help the lives of many young women

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Agree! And people who say that prefer manipulated images are sick!

  • mkohan (Hungary) 7 months ago I completely agree. Many, many amazing-looking girls in my class are depressed just because they don't have a body or hair color like a model. And if the model is airbrushed too, so the picture shown in the advertisement shows a body nobody really has - that's simply disgusting.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago It's not just the negative effect on women, it's giving men ludicrously high expectations, and not in a necessarily arrogant way, just because all they see in the media from childhood to adulthood are images of perfect bodies that can't even physically exist. I think there should be more drastic action, but this is certainly a step in the right direction.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago this have to change!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago this is necessary. sexual objectification harms women and men alike.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I agree.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago It should be noted that that "mandatory disclaimer" should be extremely visible in the ad, otherwise a lot of companies will try to use small fonts and/or a font colour that doesn't show much in the ad.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Agree

  • nandhini.muruganandam.7 (India) 7 months ago young people need to see real people not non existent models

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Worked at a photography studio that took school pictures for 8 years doing photo retouch -- we wouldn't offer anything so dramatic as you see in advertisements or even at other photo studios like Glamour Shots, but I can't tell you how sad it was when parents would come in and expect/demand that we do this kind of work for their children's pictures, especially when that child was gorgeous and flawless and it still wasn't enough. This practice is disgusting and needs to be addressed.

  • GD000007228 (Malaysia) 7 months ago No airbrush model! I agree

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Yes! Even though most people are aware models on magazines & ads are airbrushed, there are still those teenage girls who don't and are affected dramatically. Also, when someone is looking at the photograph, most people aren't considering how much airbrushing went into it. Their immediate thoughts are, "Wow, she's gorgeous, perfect even!" and don't give it a second thought. This has major implications for when we go home and look in the mirror. We don't see the plump lips or smooth behind. We see reality, and with cinema and special effects these days, reality just isn't good enough anymore. No one is happy with what they have. They want more, bigger, and better.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I think it is a good idea because airbrushing give people a false sense of reality. It cause the world to be more shallow and vain.

  • christian.judson.9 (Canada) 7 months ago i totally agree. People are tricked onto believing that they can obtain that beauty, when its unobtainable, and the standard keeps getting raised.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago its false advertising under any other name

  • Anonymous 7 months ago young girl's body image is more negative than ever before, this needs to be a law with immediate effect.

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  • Anonymous 7 months ago Totally. Young or old, male or female, it can affect anyone. Though, I'm sure almost everyone is aware that models are almost always touched-up, it should be done nonetheless.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I don't want society to promote unsustainable, unnatural and false properties.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Great idea !!!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Make it mandatory!

  • Heathergiancola33 (United States) 7 months ago Great idea...then ppl can start recognizing true/natural beauty. Could help ppl w self esteem and eating disorders...especially teens.

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  • ki (United Kingdom) 7 months ago absolutely like on cigarette packets or the mirrors state things may seem further away than they really are............... things in this picture may not be as small as they may appear.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago It's pretty bad when even MODELS aren't actually as pretty as their pictures. No wonder there are so many people (not just girls) with eating disorders.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago It gives society the wrong idea of beauty.

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  • Anonymous 7 months ago It's okay, hopefulgirl. Hentschel is just more into virtual woman. Probably quite the fan of hentai over real women.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Manipulated minds, Airbrushed bodies, Fucking new ideology of our time!

  • Kalix.912 (United Kingdom) 7 months ago They have to say when they have used false eyelashes in mascara ads, so surely it is reasonable to state if the models body h as been modified in other ways.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago I completely agree! We shouldn't stop people from airbrushing, the same way we shouldn't stop people from selling cigarettes. However, consumers have the right to know the truth, and disclaimers address that perfectly!

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Please regulate idolatry of false beauty standards. These are making our youth sick and are promoting an un achievable and objectified body image.

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  • Anonymous 7 months ago Although the underlying problem goes much deeper and should also be dealt with, this is a great idea. No matter how small the font, if the label is there and recognizable for what it is it will reiterate the (previously known or unknown) fact that these images have been modified. By being conscious about it in a daily context it could help many individuals distinguish reality from manipulated images. The truth is, no matter how much you know that images are altered, if you see a magazine ad with a perfect model you often compare yourself to them (yes, even if you have a high level of self confidence). By then seeing a message reminding you that many hours of work and computer modification has contributed, you will have a more balanced view about these images we are constantly bombarded with. In short, it would do no harm and would be a positive step in the often sketchy field of advertising.

  • 000007342 (United States) 7 months ago Girls of all ages have such a poor self image because of these altered photos. Everyone should know that people do not regularly look that way and therefore would help others to not be so hard on themselves because they know the image isn't real.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Im 17 and I developed an eating disorder and just got out of the hospital after 4 months because of media influences and its not fun... im still struggling.
    But we need to stick up and stop adjusting our bodies for other peoples standards and expectations because it is not the way things should be. If we keep on doing this people will not be happy.. We all have something beautiful to share. As soon as people think of beautiful they think of body image and being thin or muscular. Change your point of view. Beautiful is the little things that make you smile, the view from the top of a mountain, the smell of an apple pie, watching the snowfall in the street light...
    Do what makes you happy and if looking perfect is the top thing that makes you happy you should look over your priorities.

  • Anonymous 7 months ago Let's make it happen!

  • stefiquattro (Italy) 6 months ago It would be a revolution to see a disclaimer on every women pictures published on media, we must do it!

  • joceveronica8D (United States) 6 months ago I agree with this idea for a few reasons. For one it does a lot more good than harm. I think it's important for people, mostly women and young girls, to understand that no one has a perfect body. Flaws exist in everyone of us no matter how big or small. And those who appose this due to the "credibility of the artist" should recognize that no one is taking away their credited work, but merely putting the artist on display by pointing out the flawless job they've done creating perfection. If anything it just gives them more recognition. I myself know what it's like to look around and constantly envy other females for having physical qualities that I don't. It's exhausting and can be extremely discouraging to always believe that you could look better if you had that girls complexion or this girls chest/butt.. sometimes you just have a to face the reality that you don't have what they do, but you do however have every bit of yourself and that's something they don't have. The struggle is real and it's a lot harsher than most people realize. So yeah I feel this is a great idea. maybe it wont make all the worlds difference, but it could make all the difference in the world to one person.. that makes it worth it.

  • lorenitafl (Bolivia) 6 months ago I Agree

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I like this idea! I think this cheating on bodies is all wrong!

  • 000007403 (United Kingdom) 6 months ago Whilst there are a lot of people that know that this practice happens, we need to make it more transparent when it does.

  • 000007402 (United States) 6 months ago While I think it's brilliant, I don't think it'll help on the level intended. The world is so full of warning labels, disclaimers, terms, and conditions that hardly anybody pays attention to them long enough to fully read them as it would take an enormous amount of time to do so. Just look at how long the terms and conditions are that you automatically click "I agree" to the next time your iTunes updates and requires you to authorize the changes. I think a select few will stop and read it. We all know that the models are airbrushed and the advertising and fashion industries are all about illusions to get you to spend money. What we need to do is be more involved in our children's lives so they know the things that truly matter in life.

  • katarina.jovanovski.5 (Yugoslavia) 6 months ago I think this is great because, unfortunately, a lot of young girls do not believe the models are airbrushed. These girls then strive to look like somebody who essentially doesn't exist. I'm not saying I think photo-shopping should be banned but people should be made aware of the fraud.

  • eli21 (United States) 6 months ago its sad to see my friends feel so insure about their body:when all they do is get on social networks and see pictures of these fake beautiful people they wish they could look like.Their something we as a group should do

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I agree completely

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Yes this should be law. If the Law cannot be passed then maybe if Famous Women & Men became responsible Role models who name and shame the magazines that do this, and people boycott such magazines, maybe people would stop and think.Hit them were it hurts, in their pockets. Giving men and women a false sense of normality or reality on real life. I see more and more women looking false, plastic faced, expressionless, botox, filler on their faces, false hair, false eye lashes, false nails, fake tan, breast implants, and some sadly look down on people who are naturally shapely, pretty with little makeup and real loving personalities. It is time we all promote ourselves as we are, concentrate on the inner beauty and accept our different looks on our body and skin as a beautiful thing, that makes us individual and unique. Who wants to live in a world were every single person is false and identical. It would be like waking up to find everyone, including your friend and family suddenly look like a barbie doll or action man. Imagine that.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I agree with this idea. I don't believe industries will lose any money from advertisements just because they state that the models are airbrushed. Personally, I know that many models are airbrushed in advertisements, but when I see models in magazines I don't think "that girl doesn't actually look like that because she had her body manipulated on a computer", I think "I wish my waistline was smaller" or "my skin was flawless". I'm sure I am not the only one who thinks like this. A mandatory disclaimer would remind girls (especially young girls) that the models are photoshopped, and could potentionally decrease the amount of self-loathing thoughts that might lead to eating disorders among other problems in teenagers. I cannot see any down side to a mandatory disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Real people should be the ideal. Falsifying images of models and stars only servers to contribute to the plague of depression and disorders of perception which cause young people to starve themselves in the endless pursuit of an entirely imaginary ideal.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I am entirely convinced with this idea and i encourage you guys to keep up this job

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I agree

  • Anonymous 6 months ago yes plese. I vote all for it.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago "hentschel (Canada) 2 years ago
    I object because airbrushed models are hotter than non-airbrushed models" I'd like to point out this is particularly the reason there should be disclaimers on airbrushed/digitally reformed bodies, and more exposure to the more average, natural state of bodies. I'm talking men, too. But, of course, women largely suffer the repercussions of this kind of thing. I am by no means an active feminist (neither do I oppose; you go girls!), but we've got to admit that to some degree women today are objectified and judged on a much larger scale.
    So, back to this comment, "...airbrushed models are hotter than non-airbrushed models", would this be such a prevalent opinion if we were to shed some light on what's real and what isn't? Maybe not, but at least we'd know the difference. Personally, I find this point of view rather primitive and uncouth.

  • meriem.chetoui (Morocco) 6 months ago Many ladies get divorced just because they can't get the the level of airbrushed Models.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I vote for a mandatory disclaimer to state that a model body has been manipulated on a computer for advertisement purposes

  • rylin.mcgee (United States) 6 months ago I think this is a pretty good idea

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Natural is the best look on everyone!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Agreed
    If some thing is not real, there should always be a disclaimer stating the fact!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Liked the idea

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Excellent idea and about time!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago This process only provides for impossibly ideal about body image for young women and sadly the expectations of both sexes.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Airbrushing is a lie, is an advert; these days on British TV, there are disclaimers that adverts are adverts, there should be something similar with airbrushing. Though personally I think Airbrushing should be illegal

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Airbrushing is a lie, and it should be discouraged. Like John Keats said "Beauty is truth" so the more honest we are, the more beauty we will see, this is an honesty that will only help society and should be a top priority.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Airbrushing is a lie, and it should be discouraged. Like John Keats said "Beauty is truth" so the more honest we are, the more beauty we will see, this is an honesty that will only help society and should be a top priority.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Airbrushing is a lie, and it should be discouraged. Like John Keats said "Beauty is truth" so the more honest we are, the more beauty we will see, this is an honesty that will only help society and should be a top priority.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Best idea ever.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Hentchel, they'll still airbrush but they'll just have a disclaimer is all. Don't worry, you still got your fap material.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago It should be legal but like what you said, there should be a warning on it.

  • ella.annie.5 (United Kingdom) 6 months ago I know what editing software can do because I use it for my photography projects but this is too much, is abusing the fragile mental state of young girls and in general, the ideals that women have in their mind about physical beauty.

  • veduraju (United States) 6 months ago 100% agree! Let the movement begin!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Just ban it, why should there be an unhealthy relationship with looks and weight. I understand weight and looking professional but airbrushing is unreal. How can real women compete?

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I and my ten year old daughter agree that airbrushing should be disclaimed

  • Anonymous 6 months ago True... Absolutely. It has affected my life, I can see. Me of 20 years of age had a completely different idea of a perfect girl's body than what I have now at 30. 20 was healthier.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago adverts would be more effective if the products were used by humans rather than ideas

  • Anonymous 6 months ago .

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Hope for those of us who don't look like that. Which is everyone!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Yes, This should be done.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago it is absolutely disgusting to see how they disambiguate the normal women's bodies to look taller, slimmer, almost plastic.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago If there was not photo Shop or makeup. Every women in the world would not be trying to be Trying to be fake. Just to have the world to stop using photo shop would make the world a better place cuz then you would see true beauty. Rid the world of this sham! There should be a law passed to force company that they can't alter the video and use limited amount of make up in movies, Magazines, advertisements and more!

  • wallflower (United States) 6 months ago Airbrush all you want but PUT THE DISCLAIMER on it.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Warnings are the least that laws should enforce. I don't think much airbrushing should be allowed at all.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I completely agree

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Please keep it true and natural!!!!

  • 000007663 (Italy) 6 months ago I have anything against airbrushing; somehow, airbrushers can still be considered a kind of artists. But these advertisings are fooling all the people that see them, creating a bad and false concept of "beauty". So I think it would be a lot better if a disclaimer would be shown in these advertisings (which has nothing to do with censorship, like I read in some posts above).

  • GD000007668 (United States) 6 months ago The "perfect" body definitely has a negative effect on girls including myself. I'm 5'7", 115 pounds and I still think my body is not "perfect" enough

  • Anonymous 6 months ago as a father of a daughter i totally agree. fortunately for me i never was the chaser of really beautiful woman. and now this proves why

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I agree

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Airbrushed bodies are not real bodies!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Do you know what because of this unreal bodies people have a lot of complexes?

  • Anonymous 6 months ago not only should there be a disclaimer but is should be required that it be made using a large font size and very visible ALSO: hentschel = lame+

  • SparklyCrys (United States) 6 months ago The airbrushed models may look "hotter" but they are fake...people have the right to know that they naturally do not look like this and are being added to or manipulated to look better. It is an awareness that is long overdue! We are all different and we should be happy to be healthy and unique, not unhappy because we are not "perfect"!!

  • 000007722 (India) 6 months ago i think a disclaimer is important so that the females do not feel insecure about themselves and the men also need to understand that perfect bodies are generally Photoshoped!

  • Anonymous 6 months ago also into magazines.

  • samuel.tabbo (Italy) 6 months ago also into magazines.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I'm sick of chatting to young girls and guys whose favourite items are their magazines .. Airbrushing is fine, but if only if you can accept yourself for who you are first.. This applies to instagram. Keep the airbrushing but give women the confidence to accept they are beautiful without makeup first. It will become clearer to young men and women then that an airbrushed photo is nothing more than dressing up for a night out. i.e. accounting for a fraction of your life

  • Earthchild404 (United States) 6 months ago I'm all for it. It's a very small thing that can be done to tell people that they aren't necessarily expected to look like that.

  • ace21lankie (United Kingdom) 6 months ago being a photographer myself i both object and agree to this. i believe there should be a middle ground reached and the original image should be put in the corner of the image, however i also believe this wouldn't work because the whole idea of airbrushing is to better sell the product advertised. people want this false perfection, realistically it will never be achieved yet its a goal.

    an agreement needs to be found however as the airbrushing is both selling the products as it should, yet it also damages the body image of so many, to extreme lengths.

  • Anonymous 6 months ago Agreeeee

  • Anonymous 6 months ago I think that this idea could change the world, because it wont make the men think that women need to have a perfect body and the anorexia and bulimia level will decrease.

  • Mauro80 (Italy) 6 months ago We all have the perfect body. Its what we do with it that makes the true body

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I totally agree to this.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Girls, open your eyes!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I have no problem with 'airbrushing'. 'Changing everything about the model' should have a disclaimer. Something like "Artist's rendering" would be fine.

  • 000007794 (United States) 5 months ago Should be the law. With font size legible.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I think that this would be an important step in promoting healthy body image around the world and avoiding emotional and psychological distress for many people surrounding their self-esteem.

  • kkay459 (United States) 5 months ago I think this would be an important step in promoting positive body image and self esteem for all genders around the world.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I agree because people can and most likely will think that it is natural . This can lead to eating disorders.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago awesome idea

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I object because of the harm and low self esteem this causes in women and young girls. We are constantly barraged with impossible ideals from birth, then parents wonder why there is such an epidemic of eating disorders in the young.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago im so for this...and a large part of todays problem for these young girls with eating disorders or think theyre fat because theyre seeing unrealistic pictures of women that are so FAKE!! ...companies need to realize that NOONE is perfect and people should be seen as theyre are..yet unfortunately they will never use 'ordinary' people....it doesnt sell!! :(

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Our daughter's should grow up loving their bodies instead of always wishing for a fantasy. Shame on Society for sending such a negative message!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Yes

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I think this would be an amazing idea.. It needs to be labeled so that people think of it more and are more conscientious of what they are viewing and that the perception is not reality.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago false images of women portrayed by the media have negatively influenced girls throughout america to the point where most women are constantly unhappy with their bodies

  • Anonymous 5 months ago This suggestion is long overdue.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I agree because of hentschel's disturbing attraction to a distorted presentation of reality. It affects the perspective of men and women alike.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago All for this

  • Anonymous 5 months ago This is a great idea. The media needs to start putting out REAL photos. NOT FAKE ONES. It makes girls feel like they are not good enough. I see these ads and they make me feel horrible about myself because I do not look like these girls, but the truth is, is that these girls don't even look like that!! Nobody is perfect, so the media should stop trying to portray people that way!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago its an impossible standard for women! make their natural beauty show, but also remove those models that looked punched in the face. Just because then have more obvious spaced teeth doesn't mean they don't look like a horse. They parade women like that making you feel if you don't have a weird abnormality that is that obvious then you cant be a model.

  • santimonse (Argentina) 5 months ago A favor. Es una idea sencilla, que desalienta la búsqueda de una estética inalcanzable, evitando problemas graves de autoestima.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I work in a school where students are lead to believe that they are 'fat', 'ugly' and need to change their body somehow. The amount of conversations I have heard about plastic surgery is appalling. All because of what they see in the media.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Let's do it

  • Anonymous 5 months ago right its ok, photoshop is the opposite of the art...and the woman is an object

  • Anonymous 5 months ago stop

  • Anonymous 5 months ago let's stop it

  • men (Italy) 5 months ago let's stop it

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Agreed.

  • amcgettes17 (United States) 5 months ago I think that airbrushing a model makes her seem perfect when in reality nobody is perect.

  • amcgettes17 (United States) 5 months ago perfect*

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Images are extremely powerful and lead directly to life-long eating disorders which are usually kept secret because women are afraid of being judged for their out of control eating as well as for their body shape. This epidemic must be stopped. The people making money from portraying women as stick insects in order to sell something may be very "nice" people but they are wrong and need to get more honest work.

  • 000008036 (Canada) 5 months ago In addition, I want to see a mandatory reference to a neutral 3rd party forum for public comments on the advert. This allows the public to set standards, and maybe shame advertisers for harmful behaviour.
    (Like all forum systems, we need a better way to manage spam/junk/hateful comments without excluding unpopular comments. ie: hide them, but allow anyone to view even the bad ones)

    This is like the US Surgeon General's warning on cigarettes. It's a great idea, but advertisers won't willingly admit they are manipulating us. This requires political will.

  • 000008036 (Canada) 5 months ago Too bad comments here are sorted in *reverse* chronological order. The 1st commenter is an asshole, and is prominently displayed for 2 years and counting.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago These airbrushed picture are the reason why millions of young girl have low self-esteem and develop eating disorders

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Ban airbrushing crap ! It makes girls in real life look like shyt !

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Real women should be shown. The media shoves images of Photoshopped women, and provide people with an idea of how they should look, when this idea isn't even real. Eating disorders are becoming more and more common because models are made to look thinner and thinner. Look at Marilyn Monroe, she wasn't a large woman, but she wasn't thin either, and she was a sex icon. Why do models have to be thin?

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I agree. There should be a disclaimer!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago If I can draw a photorealistic picture of an attractive person from scratch in any medium, should I print a disclaimer?

  • GD000008042 (United States) 5 months ago I support banning airbrushed ads all together.

  • emcfarrell (United States) 5 months ago this isn't saying to discontinue the use of photoshop and other editing programs to manipulate the bodies and faces of the models, its simply proposing that there is a disclaimer letting the consumer know that the model has been edited, so when girls susceptible to the looks of these models feel like they're never pretty or skinny enough, they'll know that neither are these models, as they had to be photoshopped into looking like that.

  • johnnybgood14 (United States) 5 months ago All people are beautiful- its a shame that visually creative minds manipulate a models features because the social agenda makes it so there is no other way…unless we can start seeing the beauty and individuality of each person

  • Anonymous 5 months ago It's only right to disclose this practice. Too many young women are dying trying to be perfect.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Don't think it's necessary.

  • priya.chand.5 (United States) 5 months ago If there is no such thing as being perfect than why portray it to scar our youth into believing they aren't good enough and having to change the perspective of beauty of women making men objectify them even more or turn them into shallow heartless human beings? It's very simple, if you photograph and its not true in the picture then don't edit it in there.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago show real women... there a lot of gorgeous women!

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  • Anonymous 5 months ago I agree, disclaimer please.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I support this idea completely. It is okay to airbrush models, however it is of high importance to make the general public aware that the images, whether it is a female or male model, have been edited and airbrushed for the purpose of advertising. By including a disclaimer we will be building a healthier society where women AND men will lessen the pressure on themselves in obtaining a 'model's airbushed body' , and hence reducing the rate of eating disorder problems.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I agree with the idea of mandatory disclaimers!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago this is absolutely terrible what the media is putting into women's minds about beauty. To be pretty you have to be sickly skinny, and sexy. THAT IS TERRIBLE!!!<<<< why can't women be considered beautiful when they are just natural????

  • Anonymous 5 months ago A fantastic and important idea. We should be able to know if we are looking at a photo of a person, or someone's highly manipulated idea of what a woman 'should' look like.

  • 000008069 (Australia) 5 months ago A simple logo would be a great way of doing this. Nothing in small print to read (or not). Just a specially created "A" for "Airbrushed" or "Altered" would do it. Then we could all enjoy the beauty of the images, with full knowledge that anyone could make them up, they are not real people. hentschel they may be hotter but they are not real. A plastic doll is as real, would you enjoy that?

  • Anonymous 5 months ago lets do it

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I say yes, the mass media is so over powering and such an influence, there is so many things wrong with the advertising industry..its all about marketing and sales these days, the awareness of who the product influence in a negative way never gets addressed until someone gets hurt..or even die. But back to the air brush..its crazy how females chase to become this superficial image that doesnt naturally exist, and to make it worse alot of males are into that image..discuraging females, making them feel like thats the image they should be but in reality it doesnt exist, sure a boob job there, weight lose here...just be who you are..in the end it wont matter, i dont even no why it matters know..with all the bodies being laid to rest everyday, every sec. ...some one just died right know..dont waist time..(guess these last words go out to everybody.. dont be afraid to question life/things.)

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I think it's stupid #benatural

  • Anonymous 5 months ago This is such a good idea!!!!!!! Where can I vote for it!!!!!!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I support the idea. the disclaimers will become ubiquitous, but it still is the right thing to do. perhaps the editors of the photos deserve artistic attribution along with the photographers.

  • torantio (United States) 5 months ago disclaimer OR attribution to the technical editor of the photo alongside the photographer. the attribution would serve two purposes: properly acknowledging a useful skill and revealing the alteration of the photo.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I definatly think we should make a mandatory disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago This needs to happen

  • lemarcdemarseille (France) 5 months ago All "photoshoped" picture should state that it has been used. Or the other way around, genuine pictures should be recognized. It is the same for a real vs. fake Picasso.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I think that no matter where a photoshopped image may be- whether in television, magazine/ad, etc. there should be something that says the person has been edited in some way to prevent people from getting warped images of how they should be.

  • GD000008102 (United States) 5 months ago I agree completely. Porn is doing the same thing. It's disrespectful, offensive, degrading, and harmful to all womens' image. Just like airbrushed models, porn magazine models are just as fake and go through the same Photoshop process. We should start a campaign to ban it completely because all it is is harmful to society.

  • GD000008102 (United States) 5 months ago Photoshop is making many young girls feel like they cannot achieve that look and it's harming their self-image.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I vote for "Mandatory Disclaimer". The current trend of photoshop and Zero figure are detrimental to mental health and self -esteem of females. I hope media start showing a healthy normal female as role model..

  • Anonymous 5 months ago What about not a disclaimer, but to add the original picture. This would heighten awareness AND credit the artists (the touch-up-artists AND the photographers). And it's not the awareness of "the people" i'm worried about ... it's the awareness of the kids, they are the one most affected, because it's their image of the world that is manipulated most by this. Grown ups can think for themselves.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I completely agree to this idea of a disclaimer. It is not fair for normal women to be compared to these unbelievable and unexisting women. Also, it is actually not fair for beauties and models that do take care of themselves or have a natural gifted body because we put them all in the same box. We are not able to decide who is more handsome for us, but just which photo is better photoshoped. A disclaimer will be the fairest solution (as live music on tv concerts).

  • Anonymous 5 months ago La realidad no debe ser sometida al photoshop

  • Anonymous 5 months ago 100% in favour

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I think that this idea is brilliant - people should be made aware of the fact that many of these airbrushed models aren't ACTUALLY real people - and that we, as a society, should learn to accept our bodies for what they are - and learn to love them without being made to feel like we should be something that is- fundamentally- impossible.

  • popsdoodle (United Kingdom) 5 months ago i am 100% for this. Women and girls shouldn't be made to feel inadequate based on someone that is, in fact, altered themselves.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Agree!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago disclaimers should be mandatory, if only you could put a stop to the airbrushing being done in the first place and learn to appreciate natural beauty which is what we really have and what you are ultimately going to get, if the hottest models are a 10/10 what exactly are you looking at, a computerised version of a woman? screw you, I'm real

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Agreed

  • sal (Syrian Arab Republic) 5 months ago agreed

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I agree because airbrushed models are one of the reasons that one in 200 women in america have anorexia.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago The advertising companies put out with the "ideal" or "perfect" women in them are definitely hurting the lives and thoughts of women around the globe. Enough with airbrushing and photoshopping ads, have real women in them and quit treating women like products, things, or just eye candy.

  • 000008156 (United States) 5 months ago I say they shouldn't be allowed to use airbrushing in any ads at all. I truly hate government intervention but this boils down to false advertising. Let the product or celebrity stand on it's own.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I believe there should be a disclaimer when a heavily airbrushed image is used to advertise, promote or sell a product or service. In many countries, I'm sure there are laws against "False Advertising"

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I back this proposal, very much needed in the world of lies we live in.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago It's ridiculous to put these false idols on tv and in magazines. For years, many women have struggled to look "perfect" like women in the media...but it is unrealistic, even for the women on these magazine covers and tabloids.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Back to reality and also the pure beauty of life

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Yes, there should be a disclaimer on airbrushed models just as there is a disclaimer warning label on GMO products and cigarette packets in many developed countries. If a product or creation is not in its raw form (non-GMO/non-airbrushed) then the customer should be informed so they can make a decision on whether to purchase the GMO food, or in the case of air brushing, the consumer/viewer can make a decision as to whether they believe the clothes/products/services the air-brushed model is promoting will have the same benefit for the consumer or not (ie: is it real advertising or not / a lie or not), and if air-brushed models are being used not to sell a product/service and are just in a photo or video for their 'beauty' then why can't we as consumers be informed that this person doesn't really look like this in real life - that effectively it's 'art' we're viewing. I am okay with people wearing make-up and clothes that enhance features (ie: bras that lift and underwear that controls/smooths lumps) and I'm okay with air-brushing - at the end of the day it's using technology to do what humans do themselves daily without technology to create a different look and is 'art'. Unfortunately when people, especially young kids, don't know it's 'art' and believe it's what people really look like is when harm is done - just as young kids might believe that certain crops naturally kill insects that eat it when in fact it's not natural and been modified to have an insecticide grow within it (which also kills beautiful insects like butterflies). I'm not necessarily against 'progress' but consumers and viewers should be informed through a clear disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Agree!

  • Anonymous 5 months ago I support this idea and agree with others who suggest a logo and disclaimer wording at a minimum size proportionate to the advertisement it sits on

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Causing ideals that are not realistic for most people. Should be prohibited or clearly state in the advertise "not original picture"

  • Anonymous 5 months ago Yes it's lovely to see an aspirational flawless image of a woman in the media. However, this has been taken to the extreme. http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_3280203671&feature=iv&src_vid=iYhCn0jf46U&v=17j5QzF3kqE Maybe a little less photo manipulation of the dragging of the neck and legs. It's just gone a step too far. Yes to minimal editing and getting rid of that one spot, yes. But no to the over stretching of necks and bodys. This is only my opinion.

  • Anonymous 5 months ago If these images are seen as art, as people are referring to these image editors as artists, then state them as pieces of art! Not real life.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I vote YES

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Health and beauty are all about our own choices, not what we were given at birth. We are who we are, if someone wants to change you, they are not worth being a part of your life. Ditch them.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago mandatory!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I pray and I hope that this project has either been put into motion or is still being considered. I gave a speech on the subject today and I have a passion for what this idea stands for. Being a photographer I understand that photoshop is important, but being true to a woman's body is WAY more important. This is what I want to do with my future. I want to be a part of this and help girls understand their true and inner beauty. Thank you for doing what you have done. Never give up on this.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I agree. Please stop making young girls ask themselves why they are "ugly."

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Do it

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Should really but mandatory!

  • vqc03 (Canada) 4 months ago I fully support this idea that a disclaimer should be put on the photo of the models that it has been airbrushed to perfection. In our generation today, the need for acceptance (especially for women of all ages, may it be young or old) has increased and everyday, girls and women are challenged with the need to be accepted in society based on their physical appearance. I think one has to take into account that not everyone knows what part of the photograph is airbrushed, thus in their minds everyone has a perfect body but themselves. Often, people are mislead that the only part that is photoshopped is the make-up, but the sad reality is that the whole body is photoshopped. The legs are made to look longer and thinner, as well as the neck. Jaw lines and breasts are more defined. Flat stomachs and perfectly shaped buttocks. Even the facial features are photoshopped. Young girls are usually not aware of that fact, when I was a teenager, I definitely did not know that. Due to society's "Beauty Myth", some women are mislead to believe that their body is ugly, and some men are mislead to believe that every women's body should look like one in magazines. The fact that women are judged on their physical appearance more than their skills and attributes is a main factor as to why gender equality, will never really be equal. Take for example politicians, when you read about them on papers, they usually discuss their involvement with politics. Whereas for Hilary Clinton, articles ignore her ideas and motives with the political system, but rather judge her on what she was wearing during a press conference and such.

    How can one expect the future of our generation to be equal, when seemingly impossible standards exist for women to be met in order to feel accepted in society? I, for one, surely do not want my children to grow in a world where you are judge based upon your body shape.

  • JFAH55 (Colombia) 4 months ago I'm in!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago The question is "why we love these extraterrestrial bodies?" starting from the well known Barbie. Is that shape the one we want to evolve to?

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Why do we love these extraterrestrial un functional bodies?

  • Anonymous 4 months ago We need to stop airbrushing photos so that women & men stop idolizing fantasy bodies!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Women & men should be told the truth about these fantasy bodies.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago the disclaimer should only be a first step. As many women already said, even if they know it is not real, seeing it so frequently is still disturbing to them. It should be completely banned. Show the real person, or show nothing.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I fully support this effort having been deeply and negatively influenced by the media's unrealistic portrayal of women's bodies throughout my childhood and over a lifetime.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I fully support this effort having been deeply impacted by the media's unrealistic portrayal of women's bodies.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Brilliant idea. Its not telling them to stop airbrushing but to stare when they do. This would be a good way to prevent people from having unrealistic expectations.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Truth in Advertising. Yes.

  • Stewart (United Kingdom) 4 months ago In a general sense this is art, however if I were an artist I would not allow my work to be used by these marketing and advertising agencies to manipulate and warp young men and womens sense of reallity for the sake of money, so if they can't this decision for themselves then it should be necessary to label their work as 'unrealistic/ artistically modified'.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago do it because then maybe we wont have every single girl bitching about how ugly they are even when you say there beautiful or hot

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I like this!

  • GD000008378 (United States) 4 months ago I agree. In a world where it is increasingly more difficult to distinguish between real organic people, and something created or manipulated by a computer, I believe we have the right to at least be able to have help in distinguishing when appropriate. We tell people when its a professional driver on a closed course (watch the bottom of the next car commercial you see) so our expectations of the car are not misconstrued, I think it only right to extend the same courtesy to humans as well.

  • xacidzombie (Canada) 4 months ago How about making it completely illegal? I understand that it's the photographer's right to manipulate photos how they want but I think clothing would sell better knowing they were shown on proportional, real bodies.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Great idea. Women live their lives with an impossible standard. They don't realize it.

  • GD000008393 (United States) 4 months ago hentschel= scumbag. That is like saying you'd rather have a barbie then a real women. Enjoy your Barbie

  • GD000008393 (United States) 4 months ago Yes all the way because of all the little girls growing up looking at these photos. They deserve to know when the models they are looking at aren't real at all and maybe they wont grow up thinking they aren't good enough like we did.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Yo should open a campaign in change.org to be voted. or it it is already available, to publish it so people can vote.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Impressionable young girls are starving themselves because they think these "models" are the norm .... should be a disclaimer, yes, and not in small print at the bottom of the page, either !!!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Absolutely agree! Women don't need much pressure to be perfect! :(

  • 000008429 (Egypt) 4 months ago 100% agree! It's especially useful for the younger generations who don't know better, get affected by such images and take that illusion as a role model for how they're supposed to look... When they fail, they turn to eating disorders, depression and low self-esteem at best.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago We hace yo change the concepto of Beauty to somthing more real

  • mad100141 (United States) 4 months ago Why not just do a change.org petition to the senate or the obama administration?

  • Anonymous 4 months ago We demand to know the fabrics used for clothing, the mileage a car gets in city/highway driving, what is in the food we eat, and yet, we are not told when the picture in an advertisement has been altered all out of proportion to what a real human looks and is shaped like. How ridiculous is that?

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I support this. More true=natural beauty.

  • AlaskaStarling (United States) 4 months ago It is just as important as listing side effects for prescription drugs, or and ingredients list for packaged food. The mental and psychological problems caused by this are massive.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I agree it is a step in towards a more natural body image of people (male and female) presented in the mass media. Although it can be argued that people already know models are airbrushed, just declaring where it has occurred (even if in microscopic text) it is a step in the right direction. You can only walk one step at a time.

  • dheeraj.sasi (India) 4 months ago I love this idea and I support this wholeheartedly.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago it's a start..

  • neotenochtitlan (Mexico) 4 months ago What happened with this proposal? It´s very important to have a disclaimer like this because we don´t need Barbys everywhere.

  • j173 (United Kingdom) 4 months ago Great idea

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I object to air brushing and changing the appearance of models. It is unrealistic and creates a lot of issues for young girls and even women.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago This is a great idea. It is time that girls know from the get-go that the bodies shown in magazines are not the expectation, nor are they real. Real beauty does not come from a computer program manipulation of a photo, it comes from gratitude towards what your body is able do for you.

  • 000008525 (United States) 4 months ago unhealthy for young girls and all women

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I have seen first hand how this unrealistic expectation affects young women, who end up with eating disorders and mental issues in hospitals to try & reach the unrealistic. It needs to end and have women love their bodies just they way they are, beautiful!. The guy that wrote below is obviously very immature, we forgive his ignorance.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago How do we vote?

  • Anonymous 4 months ago For the health (physical and emotional) of young women, there MUST be disclaimers when using airbrushed models because our girls are trying to live up to impossible standards.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago People should definitely know when photos have been manipulated. It's shameful the pressure that is put on people to be something that is not humanely possible. A recent statistic stated that 3 out of 4 women have had some experience of an eating disorder in their lives, all due to the media's relentless pushing of fantasy body types. If a disclaimer was put on pictures it hopefully would start to change how people, especially suggestible young girls who are so vulnerable to unhappiness over body image, perceive the information they're given by the media on a daily basis. Hopefully it would teach people that what they're born with is what's natural, and obviously, there's nothing inherently wrong in nature. How you look is the most trivial thing you could be obsessing about on this planet, and anyway beauty has more than one source!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago This is one of the reasons I decided to pursue a career in the field of advertising. I was affected very negatively as a kid/teenager by misleading edited photos. This needs to stop.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I support this campaign to reduce unrealistic expectations on women.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I wholeheartedly support this!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago disclaimer should be a must!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago This is an excellent idea. Might reduce the low self esteem of women due to unrealistic expectations.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Please!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Yes!

  • Anonymous 4 months ago If it must be done then at the very least people should be made CLEARLY aware of the fact that the image does not represent the truth. These images cause great problems world wide.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago yes

  • Anonymous 4 months ago I'm voting for it. Its been proven that most teenagers and children are unable to tell whether a photo has been air brushed or not. Also to the idiot who wrote 'I object because airbrushed models are hotter than non-airbrushed models' this shows some of the unrealistic expectations guys have. Why obsess over something fake when you can have something real? try all you want hentschel you will not find a women who meets your standards and if you did she'd probably just turn you down. Also air brushing is not art. pure and simple. it is something that has led to countless eating disorders and even in some cases death. if it is art then its art that kids need to be aware off.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Completely agreed. We are harming the male psyche on the terms of what men are urged to look for in a woman by society. And what men are urged to look for is a standard set to the sky. And many, many women will do anything to try to match the standard that is being set. Let's make sure we all have the choice of acknowledging true looks and beauty by knowing when what we see is not what was actually there.

  • Anonymous 4 months ago Absolutely agree with the mandatory disclaimer. It's not only that these airbrushed models provoke young girls to have feelings of inadequacy in their own skin, but also, morons like hentschel will never fully respect any women in their lives because their perception of beauty is unrealistic. And yes, most people are aware of airbrushed models...but were you aware when you were say 10 years old??

  • Anonymous 4 months ago If you are a male you shouldn't be commenting on this...

  • shannonmou (United States) 3 months ago It is time for true gender equality. This is one step in the right direction.

  • shannonmou (United States) 3 months ago It is time for true gender equality. This is one step in the right direction.

  • Anonymous 3 months ago To anyone who says that this is unfair because it bans makeup and airbrushing and free speech and whatnot, please do us all a favor and stop being an idiot. If you actually read what you were voting on, you would see that this doesn't ban anything, it simply states that the advertisements and pictures in magazines would tell us if the model was airbrushed.

  • 000008659 (United States) 3 months ago I think it's a great idea. Seeing young girls/even boys get torn down inside over the image of perfection they strive to be from magazines, advertisements. I think it would do so much for those young men and women to see that we all have flaws, but that even through those flaws we are beautiful regardless. I think it will make a big difference in women, men, and teens if they could see how much is truly being photo shopped.

  • Anonymous 3 months ago @ Hentschel They're not gonnanot airbrush the models, they're just going to put a disclaimer.

  • Anonymous 3 months ago I support this, however it is ridiculous to think that this will change anything, in all honestly having your average women in no more than maybe foundation, mascara and lip stick to do the modelling would be best not only for young girls but men and boys of all ages and women and girls of all ages. We have these inaccurate conceptions of how we should look and be and what to wear and how to act but its all fake. If we just stuck to the general public standard of size, weight, looks, etc then less harm would come to the younger generation because life is not about looks.

  • Anonymous 3 months ago A mandatory disclaimer must be included in airbrushed photos and videos.

  • Anonymous 3 months ago good plan!:)

  • Anonymous 3 months ago I agree because as a society we are creating generations of neurotics and self obsessed individuals. Also we shape ourselves to the requirements of the community we live in, if we are bombarded with false roles we are going to always fail and we'll never be able to thrive, as the rest of nature.

  • progeny2501 (United States) 3 months ago Incredibly pointless fringe issue that has been exploded by viral marketing. There's literally almost any other submitted idea worth more time than this!

  • Anonymous 3 months ago I think they should just STOP

  • Anonymous 3 months ago It's good to have this discussion, but is it likely that there will be a mandatory disclaimer?

  • Anonymous 3 months ago I do hope that a disclaimer might make a slight difference, but it's more the idea behind the thing than the thing itself

  • Roliver (United States) 3 months ago Airbrushing models is a visual LIE: That's the point here. "Truth in Advertising" in a visual medium MUST include "truth" in visuals or it's meaningless. I have a daughter in the industry. She's a size 0-2 and worries every day about being "fat". for those guys who rely on airbrushed models to be "hot" so they can fantasize -- maybe they should get off the internet and talk to a real girl...

  • Anonymous 3 months ago I fully support this mandatory disclaimer... it is a small step, but will definitely have a large and positive impact on young teenage girls

  • Anonymous 3 months ago Airbrushed models are showing a fake image of what the people are in the society. People got obsessed and are trying to imitate those perfect yet photoshopped bodies on magazine covers and ads. Let's just stick to unedited photos and stop that airbrush thingy

  • 000009107 (United States) 3 months ago i agree and I think the disclaimer should state all that was done to the picture.

  • Anonymous 3 months ago Jack N. Guyton (United States) Can it be that the art of beauty diminishes all beauty! I grossly disagree! This is not democracy it is censorship, socialism, jealousy and evil.
    I am a photographer and artist. I have use photoshop since 1988. It is a wonderful gift to artist. Even the artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Michael Angelo and Renoir embellished the beauty of the people that they painted. I believe that today people make a big deal out of nothing and blame the world for their own short comings. People are becoming to competitive and to shallow, so they blame the artists for making women more beautiful. Art tries to make everything more ethereal for the excitement of the senses.
    People have become to politically correct! Airbrushing is not to blame because parents do not spend the time reflecting, loving and nurturing their children, as their parents did with them. People today are to busy working and making money to live or have an illusion of success and beauty. They do not have time to reflect the beauty to their children and teach them the values of self respect. No person should compare themselves with others or the images of others. It is a loosing game when you compare your inside to the outside of others. It is what that is inside that creates both inner and outer beauty.
    Some people demand to much of their lives and the Illusion of success to be available to their children. Children aren’t taught self respect or how to appreciate their on beauty. Beauty is in the vast differences or the uniqueness of each individual person. People are to busy so they blame everything for their own comfort. Everyone is not this way or that way, it is not a perfect world! Why do we blame other things for what we perceive as our imperfections. No body is perfectly anything more than another.
    Everyone is equal, just some people are more equal than others! It is all a joke so laugh and smile and love each other and know happiness. Life is to short and precious to waste.
    But most of all be aware of SHAME! It is the most toxic human trait or flaw that steals our joy and beauty and causes us to play the blaming game. Blaming others for not conforming to the worlds desire for our comfort is liken to censorship, socialism or pure evil. It is the individuality of each person or creature that gives us our own beauty and freedom! Don’t regress or demand others to abide by your needs to be comfortable. You are beautiful and comfortable because you want to be beautiful and comfortable. So be what you are and respect the dignity of all people to be and do what they want to be. As you start to share this freedom, you will suddenly awaken to the truth that we are all beautiful and always have been and always shall be most beautiful!

  • Anonymous 3 months ago I object.

  • GD000009151 (Canada) 3 months ago hentschel you make me sick and so do these unrealistic images of women that are shoved down my throat hundreds of times a day, I am done with feelings of insufficiency when it comes to my body

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  • Pascal (Canada) 2 months ago Airbrushed models are the same as comic books, anime or manga.
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  • GD000009622 (Brazil) 2 months ago We are normal. We have to be ourselves instead of an utopian ideal. Unachievable ideal.

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  • Anonymous one month ago I agree and it is time to step up against this!

  • Cheryl (Netherlands) one month ago I agree and it is time to step up against this!

  • jean.b.ricard.3 (France) one month ago So bright idea !

  • fatheralexanderson (United States) one month ago I object because companies would make less money because nobody would buy something if a obese or ugly woman was advertising something

  • mila.persin.1 (Slovenia) one month ago http://treasure.diylol.com/uploads/post/image/304463/resized_philosoraptor-meme-generator-if-steroids-are-illegal-for-athletes-shouldn-t-photoshop-be-illegal-for-models-4115a1.jpg

  • GouravChoudhary86 (India) one month ago Disclaimers should be used by the agencies or the companies while using such airbrushed models in promoting their products, as it has a negative impact on adolescents and kids.

  • 000009817 (United Kingdom) one month ago If we're made in the image of god, why do we need photoshop?

  • ashley.potter.148 (United States) one month ago How can we teach the upcoming generations of men and women, yes both genders, men have a conscience also, how can we teach them to hold themselves with pride and respect when they cannot reach what the tabloids and news and society portrays as perfection. Lets stop trying to achieve what wont be attained, lets invest in the beauty before us. Look in the mirror folks, everyone has a beautiful or sexy or heart melting characteristic.

  • janine.p.3347 (United States) one month ago I think there should be a small symbol at the bottom of a page stating that the photo has been altered from its original state, for models and for other photos as well. It would help people have a better perception of the "real" world.

  • GD000009893 (United States) one month ago awesome!

  • Anonymous one month ago I agree

  • Anonymous one month ago We need to show that being a "normal" woman is more beautiful than what the media portrays.

  • Anonymous one month ago When I was in high school I would buy a lot of magazines and I created a ridiculous notion of how my body should look. I am/ was in good shape, a healthy weight for being 5' 9' however I developed an eating disorder and got very sick because I thought I needed to be thinner than I already was. I am wanting to go into advertising so that that doesn't happen to other girls. Models are beautiful thin girls already and I have modeled my self, to change them even more beyond what is realistically possible and natural is not ok and really affects people whether they realize it or not. It even affects the models. I have looked back at images go myself and though, this isn't me, she looks like a plastic bad barbie version of me. Thats why I'm voting in agreement.

  • alexsandria.ravellaolson (United States) one month ago As a young model I understand how this affects girls. When I was in high school I would buy a lot of magazines and thought that I needed to be thinner than I already was, not realizing just how much editing is really being done. I developed an eating disorder and got very sick. I am now going into advertising because I don't want this to happen to other women. I now look back at pictures and say that that's not even me, its a plastic barbie version of me. Models are already beautiful thin girls and no one is perfect. More people need to realize this. We should be healthy and airbrushed models don't promote healthy habits or thoughts. Thats why I support the disclaimer.

  • Anonymous one month ago It's about time.

  • Anonymous one month ago I think having a mandatory disclaimer is a good idea, it's not saying that there can't be anymore airbrushing, etc. - not that I necessarily agree with that- moreover, it's in the least informing girls, boys, woman, and men alike that a photo has been manipulated to be more visually appealing. It lets them know that the photo is not an ideal way for a person to be.

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  • crazypal24x7 (India) one month ago lets preserve the real beauty

  • andre.noronha.9 (Brazil) one month ago They´re selling a lie.

  • 000010040 (United States) one month ago It's time to do something about this kind of manipulations Ad from damaging young people.

  • Anonymous one month ago This would be great for any ads promoting weight loss pills.It will make people want to stop taking them knowing that the results they see on the page are most likely artificial.Diet and exercise delivers healthy results,not drugs.

  • Anonymous one month ago I think it is wrong to set unrealistic standards.. considering I know personally a lot of people who suffer.

  • Anonymous one month ago anything other than disclosure is simply deceitful.

  • jgsaldivia (Venezuela) one month ago I guess the way hentschel have sex is masturbating using a magazine front page showing an airbrushed model

  • jesper.h.brun (Denmark) one month ago I'm a strong supporter of the idea, but I do not see a possibility to ban it totally from the mass media. I must admit that the models themselves holds a responsibility too if you ask me, because the willing to object against as a worker causes the industry to lose them. If models spoke out publicly about the manipulation, they would garner the required attention.

  • GD000010158 (United States) one month ago Great step in the right direction. There needs to be a line where the physical expectations for women are actually in the bounds of reality. A simple written acknowledgement that shots have been altered could change the way people perceive the world around them dramatically in a very positive way.

  • MMaris (United States) one month ago People need to understand that this not only gives unrealistic expectations to children and teens, but to full grown adults as well. People expect things that aren't ever going to happen in real life, and that will affect happiness. Why bother looking for someone if they'll never look like that model in the magazine? Well, news flash. No one is ever going to look exactly like that, except in your head. Let people live out their lives without being told to look a certain way. Just live out your life the way you want to, don't pay attention to the standards of "beauty". People who really care won't say you NEED to look beautiful, you will be beautiful to THEM, all on your own. Be yourself.

  • jenelle.sullivan1 (Australia) one month ago This makes me so angry. As if there isn't enough pressure on girls and women already

  • take.it.shalla (Italy) one month ago once you airbrush a person, take all their imperfections and distinctive physical aspects which make them unique, you destroy the person. you're no longer using a real person to advertise products for other people - you're using computerized, fake image.

  • staceyrose.blass (United States) one month ago We just need to know. Do whatever, but TELL US so we can make our own choices!

  • Anonymous one month ago I agree because we can already see the damage it is causing to girls

  • msutherland (United States) one month ago This is one of the main causes for body dysmorphic disorder. We all need to wake up and change our shame-based culture to one that affirms and celebrates our uniqueness.

  • Anonymous 27 days ago Keep going. I support you.

  • Anonymous 27 days ago I agree to this immensely. How hard is it to put a god damn tag or something on the page saying that the model has been photo-shopped/airbrushed? All this rubbish in magazines are giving so many young girls around the world the complete wrong idea about what beauty is. Thousands, if not millions, of girls get brainwashed into thinking that these images are what beauty/perfection really is and they can develop anorexia to become skinnier and get the thigh gap and flat stomach. And all these girls, most of them physically can't get the body that they believe is 'perfect' and because that they can't they either die of starvation/ lack of nutrients and food. or they commit suicide because they will never be as 'beautiful' or 'perfect' as all of the models they see on magazines. But the beauty magazines and everything don't care about that and only care about making money and keeping their business alive. They refuse to put the label/disclaimer that the model is airbrushed because they know if they do that then they would lose customers as they know that the image is fake. They will not stop doing this until a law or something is put in place.

  • 000010271 (United States) 26 days ago Agreed, support this movement. It's not just about censorship as it only adds a disclaimer. It has nothing to do with how "hot" they are, it just provides people with realistic expectations.

  • Anonymous 22 days ago Natural is perfect

  • Anonymous 20 days ago I vote in favor of this.

  • Tanya9984 (United States) 15 days ago We should know when something is airbrushed.

  • Anonymous 14 days ago i object to air brushing as it is destroying our childrens ideas of what is normal and beautiful

  • Nataliekim (Brazil) 13 days ago Agreed! After all if the advertisers and etc think it's perfectly ok to manipulate the bodies and faces what would be the problem in letting everyone know when they do it?

  • 000010398 (United Kingdom) 12 days ago Profit should never be placed before self confidence and psychological well being.

  • lee.gibson.965 (United Kingdom) 11 days ago Though really it should be stopped completely instead of a disclaimer.
    But first things first.

  • debbie.lonnen (United Kingdom) 11 days ago We should all be accepted as who we are ad not what we look like. Why should women be expected to look perfect! Why will natural not do in this world

  • Debs (United Kingdom) 11 days ago Disgusting, Why do we subject society to this. This is why so many people feel inadequate and in some cases take their own lives. This needs to stop!!!!

  • mrsraper (United Kingdom) 11 days ago .

  • lou.l.brown.7 (United Kingdom) 10 days ago If the models are beautiful- they will not need airbrushing and manipulating. That's why they're models because they have natural beauty - if the camera men are truly good they can picture them at their best without manipulating them or getting rid of blemishes etc. If everyone stopped digitally enhancing pics then no one would have an upper hand- and people would not be judged in comparison to these "creations".

  • Anonymous 10 days ago if airbrushing is done for artistic purposes what is the problem with the disclaimer? the only reason not to have this disclaimer is to deceive people into buying a concept or ideal based on their product.

  • GD000010486 (United Kingdom) 9 days ago In order to promote healthy and realistic body ideals I think this is necessary.

  • Anonymous 9 days ago Not just a great idea but necessary

  • Anonymous 9 days ago Essential for everyone's sake.

  • Anonymous 9 days ago I have a daughter and I don't want her to grow up thinking that these girls are normal or real.

  • emma.garioch (United Kingdom) 8 days ago Brilliant idea!

  • 000010532 (United Kingdom) 8 days ago So many girls are under pressure these days to look like models in magazines, TV and advertising - when in actual fact, a lot of these girls have been tampered with and air brushed.

  • 000010535 (United Kingdom) 8 days ago I agree, and I'm a photographer. When I do shoots, I refuse point blank to do anything other then remove blemishes, add filters and change the level, curves and colour balance to rectify any issues. And anyone who wants a shoot done by me knows this in advance. I refuse to make people, who are already all beautiful in their own way, into the Barbie standard of what fantasist shovanists believe to be beauty...

  • REAPER (United Kingdom) 7 days ago Real people should always be shown or a disclaimer to state digitally enhanced should be place prominently on screen.

  • GD000010558 (United Kingdom) 7 days ago hentschel I think you've kind of missed the point...

  • Stephiebarker88 (United Kingdom) 6 days ago I have no issue with airbrushing itself, as it aids companies in selling there products. Never the less, I have voted for the use of a disclaimer on said airbrushing as it can create an unrealistic ideal look for young girls. It causes great problems in teens including anorexia and bulimia and a general feeling of low self esteem. Not just in girls I might add . Eating disorders are rising in number for young boys aswell.

  • 000010622 (United Kingdom) 5 days ago This won't solve body image issues, as the image will still be airbrushed, but it will definitely be a step in the right direction.

  • edward.mann.376 (United Kingdom) 5 days ago Airbrushing images is wrong. It creates a false idea of what women believe is teal beauty. More should be done to use models of all shapes and sizes for both men and women. After all we are not all the same and shouldn't have to be subjected to the media's perceptions on what is beautiful.

  • lorenzo.barbera.9 (Ireland) 5 days ago I object because this is having a major effect on our children!

  • Anonymous 5 days ago It's wrong and I'm sure makes the woman feel insecure about herself that they need to "perfect" her having a devastating effect on young women and young men by seeing these women as objects and degrading them END IT NOW nobody is perfect there's no such thing we are unique and beautiful warts an all.

  • 000010629 (Canada) 5 days ago Awareness isn't enough but it helps

  • Charity (United Kingdom) 4 days ago Hopeful!!!

  • Jo (United States) 4 days ago I am totally in agreement with making this disclaimer mandatory, however I think it would be better received and easier to establish if there was a little leeway. For example, it's illegal to copy a fabric print --unless there are at least 7 (?) changes made to the print. My company was sued when, unbeknownst to me, I bought a print for manufacturing skirts that was copied without enough changes. Airbrushing stray hairs, chipped nail polish, etc. is harmless. It's the thinning, adding of cleavage, lengthening of legs etc. that I worry about --giving young girls (and older ones) an ideal that doesn't exist creates low self-esteem.

  • emma.m.wilmore (United Kingdom) 4 days ago I just think it's unrealistic and the poor models themselves that are already naturally attractive are made to feel not good enough by the changes the airbrushing does. It's just unfair for them and unfair for the women young girls in the real world, just accept beauty for what it is and don't keep expecting more and more.
    After all perfection is imperfection.

  • GD000010666 (Australia) 4 days ago Totally agree

  • soulgate (Australia) 4 days ago Airbrushing bodies sets up unattainable expectations for both, men and women as well as young girls.

  • Anonymous 3 days ago Absolutely should be mandatory. Young girls see these 'perfect' images and feel inadequate.

  • Anonymous 3 days ago It should be clearly stated that images were manipulated.

  • Anonymous 3 days ago If it helps young people to believe in themselves and not what the media portray as "beauty" then I agree with the disclaimer.

  • veeory (Romania) 2 days ago I vote because I know women are more beautiful than a Photoshop brush

  • catherine.austin.5602 (Australia) 5 hours ago It is misleading,,, therefor an illusion and a lie! We have the right to know the truth!